Cabbage Coconut Curry

Sri Lankan Cabbage & Coconut Curry - Gowa Mallum

Just one week into my ten weeks of travels through Sri Lanka, I had the opportunity to go in the kitchen at Mango Garden in Kandy, Sri Lanka to help prepare the New Year’s Eve dinner. The head cook showed me how to make a number of amazing vegetarian (vegan) Sri Lankan curries and dishes, including this one. I also learned how to make Pol Sambol for the first time, always awesome Beetroot Curry, fantastic Leek Curry, Dal Curry (of course), Green Bean “Bonchi” Curry, and Snake Gourd Curry (which can be made with any squash, such as Zucchini.)Sri Lankan Cabbage & Coconut Curry - Gowa Mallum

Gowa Mallum

Weißkohl-Kokos-Curry

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 30 Min.

  • 1 kleiner Kopf (350 g) Weißkohl klein geschnitten
  • 1 kleine rote Zwiebel gehackt
  • 1 Knoblauchzehe fein gehackt
  • 1 kleine rote oder grüne Chilischote entsamt, fein gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • 1–2 EL Kokos- oder Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 1/2 TL Currypulver
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 1 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1–2 kleine Stückchen Zimtrinde oder 1 Prise gemahlener Zimt
  • 6–8 Curryblätter
  • 1/2 Tasse (120 ml) Kokosmilch
  • 2–3 EL Kokosraspel
  • 1 EL Limetten- oder Zitronensaft
  • 1 TL Agavensirup oder Zucker
  • 3/4 TL Meersalz
  1. In einem mittelgroßen Topf Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (nach etwa 20 bis 30 Sek.) Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Chili (wenn verwendet), Currypulver, gemahlenen Kreuzkümmel, Koriander, schwarzen Pfeffer, Kurkuma, Zimt und Curryblätter zugeben. 3 bis 5 Min. unter Rühren anbraten, bis die Zwiebel weich wird.
  2. Klein geschnittenen Weißkohl und Kokosraspel einrühren. Halb abgedeckt unter regelmäßigem Rühren 2 bis 3 Min. garen.
  3. Kokosmilch, Limetten– oder Zitronensaft, Agavensirup (oder Zucker) und Salz hinzufügen. Mehrere Male umrühren. Flamme niedrig stellen. Halb abgedeckt unter regelmäßigem Rühren 10 bis 15 Min. köcheln lassen, bis der Weißkohl zusammengefallen und weich ist. Für ein cremigeres Curry während des Köchelns nach und nach je nach Vorliebe mehr Kokosmilch unterrühren.
  4. Vor dem Anrichten die Zimtrindenstückchen entfernen. Mit Reis servieren.

Variationen:

Rot & scharf: 1/2 TL Chili- oder scharfes Paprikapulver und 4 bis 6 halbierte Cherrytomaten zusammen mit dem Weißkohl zugeben. Extra fein: Weißkohl und Zwiebel sehr fein hacken. Kochzeit entsprechend anpassen. Orange: Gegen Ende der Kochzeit 1 geraspelte oder fein gehackte Möhre zusammen mit der Kokosmilch einrühren.

Continue reading

Deviled Chickpeas – Kadala Thel Dala

Deviled Chickpeas - Kadala Thel Dala from The Lotus and the Artichoke - SRI LANKA vegan cookbook

This is another one of my favorite, quick-and-easy Sri Lankan recipes. I tried many versions of this spicy chickpea curry dish all over Sri Lanka during my 10 week adventure all across and around the island.

You can serve it as a main dish, but technically it’s a short eat (the Sri Lankan term for snack or appetizer or small meal.) Like most short eats, it’s a common snack from street food vendors, but also appears on restaurant menus and is often available from many take-out places… and on buses as a cheap finger food snack – in it’s much drier variation.

Traditionally it’s not served in a curry sauce, but is made “dry”. (This is something I found a lot in India and Sri Lanka — also with dishes such as Vegetable Manchurian or Gobi 65, and such.) I like cooking Kadala Thel Dala all kinds of ways, but usually make it without a really runny, liquid-y curry. Limiting the amount of chopped tomatoes (and cutting larger pieces) as well as using enough grated coconut (to soak up liquid) gets the chickpea curry to desired consistency. Note that rinsing and draining your chickpeas very well before cooking will help, and adding a few minutes of stir-frying on high, while constantly stirring, will also get rid of excess liquid.

Like my Jackfruit Curry, this dish is very popular with all types of eaters, it can be made spicy or not spicy (great for kids!), and is an excellent introduction to Sri Lankan flavors. It’s another one of my go-to recipes for dinner parties, cooking classes, cooking shows. I make it at home pretty often, too.

In addition to being in my third vegan cookbook The Lotus and the Artichoke – SRI LANKA, it’s been published in several vegan magazines in Germany. It’s such a simple and satisfying recipe. Also I love this photo! The little green hand-painted demon guy is on a decorative wooden thing I picked up at a shop in touristy – but gorgeous – Galle Fort, not too far from Unawatuna, and where we spent our last two weeks on the southwest coast in the beach village of Dalawella.

Deviled Chickpeas - Kadala Thel Dala from The Lotus and the Artichoke - SRI LANKA vegan cookbook

Kadala Thel Dala
teuflisch würzige Kichererbsen

Rezept aus meinem veganen Kochbuch: The Lotus and the Artichoke – SRI LANKA: Eine kulinarische Entdeckungsreise mit über 70 veganen Rezepten

2 bis 3 Portionen / Dauer 30 Min.

  • 2 Tassen (400 g) gekochte Kichererbsen oder 1 Tasse (185 g) getrocknete Kichererbsen
  • 6–8 Cherrytomaten halbiert oder 1 mittelgroße (80 g) Tomate gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (100 g) rote Zwiebel gehackt oder 2–3 Frühlingszwiebeln gehackt
  • 1 Knoblauchzehe fein gehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 grüne Chilischote entsamt, fein gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • 1 EL Kokos- oder Pflanzenöl
  • 1/2 TL Currypulver wenn gewünscht
  • 1/2 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 1 TL Chili- oder Paprikapulver
  • 1/2 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 6–8 Curryblätter
  • 2 EL Kokosraspel
  • 1 TL Sojasoße (Shoyu)
  • 2 EL Limetten- oder Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Agavensirup oder Zucker
  • 1 TL Meersalz
  • frisches Koriandergrün gehackt, zum Garnieren
  1. Beim Verwenden getrockneter Kichererbsen: 8 Stunden oder über Nacht einweichen. Abgießen, spülen und in einem mittelgroßen Topf mit frischem Wasser 60 bis 90 Min. weich kochen. Abgießen. Kichererbsen aus der Dose vor dem Verwenden abgießen und spülen.
  2. In einem großen Topf Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Gehackte Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Ingwer, Chili (falls verwendet), Currypulver, gemahlenen Kreuzkümmel, Koriander, schwarzen Pfeffer, Chili– oder Paprikapulver, Kurkuma und Curryblätter hineingeben. 3 bis 5 Min. unter ständigem Rühren anbraten, bis die Zwiebel weich wird.
  3. Gekochte Kichererbsen, gehackte Tomaten, Kokosraspel, Sojasoße, Limettensaft, Agavensirup (oder Zucker) und Salz hinzufügen. Gut umrühren. 9 bis 12 Min. halb abgedeckt unter regelmäßigem Rühren schmoren.
  4. Mit frisch gehacktem Koriandergrün oder grünen Frühlingszwiebelringen garnieren und servieren.

Variationen:

Vedisch: Zwiebel und Knoblauch mit 1 Prise Asafoetida (Hingpulver) und mehr gehackten Tomaten ersetzen. Intensiveres Rot: 1 EL Tomatenmark zusammen mit den Kichererbsen zugeben. “Dry”: Ohne Tomaten und mit noch 1–2 EL Koksraspeln.

Dieses Rezept stammt aus meinem 3. veganen Kochbuch The Lotus and the Artichoke – SRI LANKA: Eine kulinarische Entdeckungsreise mit über 70 veganen Rezepten Continue reading

Sri Lankan Jackfruit Curry

Jackfruit Curry Dinner from The Lotus and the Artichoke - SRI LANKA!

Sri Lankan Jackfruit Curry

This is absolutely one of my favorite dishes and recipes from my SRI LANKA vegan cookbook & ebook! I make it often at home, and have cooked it up for many dinner parties, cooking shows, and it’s regularly featured at the cooking classes I do, too. It’s really easy to make and it’s one of those dishes that’s a real crowd-pleaser, for vegans, vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike.

Strangely, Sri Lankan food is still not really that well-known in the world culinary scene — and the vegan scene, but it’s popularity and visibility has improved in the last few years. It’s kind of like jackfruit itself, which only recently has started to get really hyped and celebrated outside of Asia, where it has a long tradition and has been enjoyed for… well, practically forever! I suspect as Sri Lanka becomes more popular as a travel destination, more people will fall in love with the cuisine. Admittedly, I fell in love with Sri Lankan food about 10 years before my trip to Sri Lanka — there are some amazing Sri Lankan and South Indian eateries in Paris and Berlin that blew me away!

This Sri Lankan Jackfruit Curry is made with coconut milk, and it’s really creamy and intense. Jackfruit, kind of like plain tofu or tempeh or soy chunks (TVP), takes on the flavors of the sauce and marinade. The texture and freshness are amazing, and I enjoy it much more than the soy and faux-meat variations. (Which all work in this curry mix, too, btw!) You can use all kinds of coconut milk, or even make your own. If I buy coconut milk, I always try to get organic coconut milk with no weird additives and preservatives. In Germany, my favorite coconut milk is from Dr Goerg. It’s super rich and creamy, and combined with a little hit of coconut blossom syrup in the curry, this dish gets crazy delicious!

The main thing to know about cooking with jackfruit outside of Asia is: It’s easy to find! It’s inexpensive and really nothing bizarre. Almost every Asian import grocery store I’ve been to in the US, Canada, Germany, France, England, Holland and other parts of Europe, whether big city or little town, has Green Jackfruit (unsweetened!) in a can… but the yellow jackfruit which is primarily for sweet dishes and desserts is also usable, if you rinse off the syrup and adjust the spices / salt accordingly. Green jackfruit is the unripened, slightly tougher, less sweet fruit.

I had Jackfruit Curry in at least 10 different places in the 10 weeks I spent in Sri Lanka. Each restaurant and every family make it a bit different. I’ve also made lots of different variations on this one– sometimes sweeter, sometimes spicier, sometimes creamier, sometimes with other fun stuff like greens… or even pineapple!Jackfruit Curry Dinner from The Lotus and the Artichoke - SRI LANKA!

Jackfrucht Curry
srilankische Spezialität mit Kokosmilch

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – SRI LANKA: Eine kulinarische Entdeckungsreise mit über 70 veganen Rezepten

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 30 Min.

  • 2 1/2 Tassen (350 g) junge grüne Jackfrucht (ungesüßt!)
  • 1 mittelgroße rote Zwiebel gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 1 grüne oder rote Chilischote entsamt, fein gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • 2 EL Pflanzen- oder Kokosöl
  • 1 TL Currypulver
  • 1/2 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Bockshornkleesamen gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Schwarze Senfsamen gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Chili- oder Paprikapulver
  • 3/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 2 kleine Stückchen Zimtrinde
  • 6–8 Curryblätter
  • 2 Lorbeerblätter oder Pandanusblätter
  • 1 Tasse (240 ml) Kokosmilch
  • 1/2 Tasse (120 ml) Wasser bei Bedarf mehr
  • 1–2 EL Limetten- oder Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Agavensirup oder Zucker
  • 3/4 TL Meersalz
  • frisches Koriandergrün gehackt, zum Garnieren
  1. Jackfrucht aus der Dose abgießen und spülen. In Würfel oder Streifen schneiden.
  2. In einem Topf Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Chili (wenn verwendet), Currypulver, Kreuzkümmel, Koriander, schwarzen Pfeffer, Bockshornkleesamen, Senfsamen, Chili– oder Paprikapulver, Kurkuma, Zimt, Curry– und Pandanusblätter (oder Lorbeerblätter) hineingeben. 3 bis 5 Min. unter Rühren anbraten, bis die Zwiebel weich wird.
  3. Jackfruchtstücke, Limetten– oder Zitronensaft, Agavensirup (oder Zucker) und Salz zugeben und gut umrühren. Weitere 3 bis 5 Min. unter Rühren braten.
  4. Kokosmilch zugießen und mehrere Male umrühren. Zum Kochen bringen. Flamme niedrig stellen und halb abgedeckt unter regelmäßigem Rühren 12 bis 15 Min. köcheln, bis die Jackfruchtstücke weich werden und beginnen zu zerfallen. Für ein dünneres Curry während des Kochens je nach Bedarf nach und nach Wasser (oder mehr Kokosmilch) einrühren.
  5. Vor dem Servieren Zimtrinde und Lorbeerblätter entfernen.
  6. Mit frisch gehacktem Koriandergrün garnieren und mit Reis servieren.

Variationen:

Rot & Süß: 1 Tasse (75 g) gehackte Ananas und 1 gehackte Tomate zusammen mit der Jackfrucht zugeben. Vedisch: Zwiebeln und Knoblauch mit 1 Prise Asafoetida (Hingpulver) ersetzen.

Dieses Rezept stammt aus meinem 3. veganen Kochbuch The Lotus and the Artichoke – SRI LANKA: Eine kulinarische Entdeckungsreise mit über 70 veganen Rezepten

Continue reading

Dum Aloo

Dum Aloo – North Indian Tomato Potato Curry - The Lotus and the Artichoke

This recipe and story first appeared as a guest post on Scissors & Spice. Thanks again, Lynn!

Dum Aloo is one of many unsung heroes of Indian vegetarian cooking, with paneer, kofta, and mixed veg dishes usually stealing the spotlight. If you like potatoes and enjoy creamy, tomato-based curries, this delicious wonder will win you over. Soon you’ll be cooking it regularly and looking out for it on menus.

When I lived in Amravati, India, teaching Art and English for a year at a Cambridge International School, I quickly made friends with much of the neighborhood. From the first day, I was invited to family meals and constantly got amazing offers of home-cooked lunches. It was culinary heaven!

I learned so much about traditional Indian cooking (and a lot of Hindi) from the family of one of the local vegetable cart vendors who lived down the street. In the evenings, I’d often hear a knock at the door or get a short text message, and within minutes the kitchen was alive: full of cheery voices, sizzling sounds, amazing smells, and the incredible, vivid colors of spices and fresh vegetables.

Dum Aloo – North Indian Tomato Potato Curry - The Lotus and the Artichoke

Dum Aloo – Nordindisches Tomaten-Kartoffel-Curry

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.+

  • 2 mittelgroße / 160 g Tomaten gehackt
  • 1 kleine rote Zwiebel gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen feingehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1/3 Tasse / 40 g Cashewkerne
  • 1 + 1/2 Tasse / 360 ml Wasser
  • 2 EL Öl
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Garam Masala
  • 1/8 TL Asafoetida
  • 4-5 mittelgroße oder 10-12 kleine / 450 g Kartoffeln geschält, grob gewürfelt
  • 1/2 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Tomatenmark
  • 2 EL Kichererbsenmehl
  • 1 EL Zucker oder Agavensirup
  • 1 TL Salz
  • frische Korianderblätter oder getrocknete Bockshornkleeblätter zum Garnieren
  1. Cashewkerne 30 Min. in 1/2 Tasse Wasser einweichen.
  2. Gehackte Tomaten, Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Ingwer, Cashewkerne und Einweichwasser in Küchenmaschine glatt pürieren.
  3. In einem großen Topf Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen.
  4. Gemahlenen Koriander, Kreuzkümmel, Garam Masala und Asafoetida zugeben und 1 Min. anbraten.
  5. Kartoffelwürfel und Kurkuma hinzufügen und 5-7 Min. unter Rühren braten.
  6. Zitronensaft und Tomatenmark einrühren und auf mittlerer Flamme weitere 2-3 Min. kochen.
  7. Püree unterrühren und 5-7 Min. kochen, bis die Kartoffeln weich sind und die Soße eingedickt ist.
  8. 1 Tasse Wasser, Kichererbsenmehl, Zucker und Salz hinzufügen. 5 Min. abgedeckt auf niedriger Flamme köcheln lassen.
  9. Mit gehackten Korianderblättern garnieren. Mit Basmati-Reis, Naan- oder Chapati-Brot servieren.

Variationen:

Vedisch: Knoblauch und Zwiebel weglassen, 1 kleine Tomate mehr zum Püree geben und 1 TL braune Senfsamen zusammen mit den anderen Gewürzen vor Zugabe der Kartoffeln anbraten. Cremig: 1 Tasse Sojamilch oder Kokosmilch anstatt 1 Tasse Wasser verwenden. Scharf: 1 gehackte rote oder grüne Chilischote oder 1/2 TL rote Chiliflocken vor Zugabe der Kartoffeln mit den anderen Gewürzen anbraten.

  Continue reading

African Red Curry

African Red Curry with coconut and tofu - The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegan cookbook

This African Red Curry is a hybrid dish which takes a more typically Asian (particularly Thai and Indonesian) curry recipe and changes up a few key ingredients and spices. I love to make Thai curries of all kinds– yellow curry, green curry, red curry, and my personal favorite: Massaman curry, usually with potatoes, tofu, onion, and peanuts. Anytime I see it in my travels I have to try it, and am constantly amazed at how different countries and different cooks prepare it. Massaman curry is by origin a hybrid dish: a Thai recipe enhanced by the aromatic spices that Muslim traders brought to South East Asia in ages past.

When I lived in Boston’s Chinatown and later in Philadelphia’s Chinatown, I experimented often with store-bought curry pastes from the Asian supermarkets. This recipe goes for a more Do-It-Yourself  approach, also altering the base ingredients to make a more world-fusion recipe. I enjoy making my own homemade sauces and curries and I encourage you to try the same. Anyone can buy prepared sauce and paste in a jar, but when you make an awesome curry from scratch and it works, it’s so satisfying!

If I had to locate the Africa in this African curry, I’d trace it back to Mombasa on the Kenyan coast. I had such an amazing, spicy coconut curry at this simple place in the old Muslim quarter of town. I remember how intrigued I was by the Asian influence and artifacts I saw on that first trip to Africa. I was continually surprised by great Indian food and Thai and other Asian restaurants in Nairobi and other cities in East Africa. Even on the other side of Africa, in Senegal and The Gambia, a good decade later, I also enjoyed excellent Asian, particularly Indian food. Just goes to show, people have been migrating, moving, and mixing world cuisines with amazing results for a long, long time.

African Red Curry with coconut and tofu - The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegan cookbook

Afro-Asiatisches Rotes Curry– mit Süßkartoffeln und Tofu

(Rezept auf deutsch erscheint demnächst!) Continue reading

Eggplant Basil Thai Curry

Eggplant Basil Coconut Tofu Curry : Thai - The Lotus and the Artichoke

This recipe for Eggplant Basil Thai Curry is based on one of my favorite dishes from the takeaway Thai counter at the family-style, super authentic, sometimes dicey Boston Chinatown Eatery. I hear it has since closed, but my artist friends and I used to hang out there all the time in the 90s when we were doing the art studio loft thing in Boston downtown, working in Fort Point’s emerging web design studios, and in the days I was running Gallery Insekt, an experimental not-for-profit artspace.

In my travels in Thailand I had many excellent similar dishes with basil and eggplant, mostly in bustling Bangkok back alleys and on the then mostly-undiscovered paradise Ko Chang island. The coconut spin is actually my doing, making this sort of a hybrid dish with more classic Thai coconut curries.

I’ve also experimented with more tomato and no coconut milk. This results in more of a stir-fry and less of a creamy coconut curry. See what works for you! If unfamiliar with salting eggplant prior to cooking, I suggest looking it up online or in any comprehensive cookbook discussing vegetable cookery. Cooks have debated endlessly on whether or not salting eggplant is necessary. I learned the trick ages ago from my mother and stand by it. Using Asian aubergine is a way around it – they naturally have a milder, less bitter flavor. If you don’t like eggplant, it can be replaced with squash or zucchini.

Eggplant Basil Coconut Tofu Curry : Thai - The Lotus and the Artichoke

Aubergine-Basilikum-Thai-Curry

2-3 Portionen / Zubereitungszeit 45 Min.

  • 1 mittelgroße / 220 g Aubergine
  • 220 g Tofu
  • 3 EL Öl
  • 1 mittelgroße rote Zwiebel gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen feingehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer feingehackt
  • 1 TL Koriandersamen gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL rote Chiliflocken oder 1-2 rote oder grüne Chilischoten
  • 1 mittelgroße Tomate gehackt
  • 1 TL Tamarindpaste + 1/4 Tasse Wasser
  • 1 TL Sojasoße
  • 180 ml Kokosnussmilch
  • 1/2 TL Zucker
  • 1/4 – 1/2 TL Salz (+ mehr für das Salzen der Aubergine)
  • 1/2 Tasse frisches Basilikum gehackt (+ 3-4 Blätter zum Garnieren)
  • 1/4 Tasse Cashewnüsse leicht geröstet
  1. Aubergine vierteln und in Scheiben schneiden. Gut salzen und 10-20 Min. schwitzen lassen. Abspülen und trocken tupfen.
  2. Tofu pressen (überschüssige Flüssigkeit herausdrücken) und würfeln / in ca. 1 cm dicke Scheiben, Streifen oder Dreiecke schneiden.
  3. Öl in großem Topf oder Wok auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen.
  4. Knoblauch, Zwiebel, Ingwer, Koriander und Chili 2 Min. anbraten.
  5. Aubergine und Tofu hinzugeben. Unter regelmäßigem Rühren ca. 5-8 Min. braten bis der Tofu goldbraun ist.
  6. Tomate und Sojasoße hinzufügen. 2 Min. braten und regelmäßig rühren.
  7. Tamarindenpaste und Wasser beigeben, gut mischen, zum Köcheln bringen und 2-3 Min. bei regelmäßigem Rühren köcheln lassen.
  8. Kokosnussmilch hinzufügen, erneut zum Kochen bringen, dann Hitze auf mittlere Flamme reduzieren. 5 Min. köcheln, dabei regelmäßig umrühren.
  9. Basilikum, Zucker und Salz hinzufügen, untermischen und weitere 4-5 Min. köcheln lassen.
  10. Mit Jasminreis servieren und gerösteten Cashewnüssen und Basilikumblättchen garnieren.

 

Thai : Eggplant Basil Coconut Tofu Curry process - The Lotus and the Artichoke  Thai : Eggplant Basil Coconut Tofu Curry process 2 - The Lotus and the Artichoke

Thai : Eggplant Basil Coconut Tofu Curry process 4 - The Lotus and the Artichoke  Thai : Eggplant Basil Coconut Tofu Curry process 3 - The Lotus and the Artichoke

Variationen:

Die Kokosnussmilch kannst du mit 1/2 Tasse Wasser und + 1/2 TL Maisstärke oder 2 Tomaten ersetzen. Für einen noch exotischeren Geschmack erweitere deine Gewürzmischung um etwas feingehacktes Zitronengras und 1/2 TL geschroteten schwarzen Pfeffer.

 Eggplant Basil Coconut Tofu Curry : Thai - The Lotus and the Artichoke

Continue reading

Bengan Bhartha

Bengan Bhartha - Indian - The Lotus and the Artichoke

Bengan Bhartha is an incredible, spicy Indian eggplant puree. Similar to Middle Eastern baba ganoush, it’s traditionally eaten with flat bread. My North Indian pals would never dream of eating this dish with rice, but if you’re not a chapati master yet and want to enjoy it with some Basmati, I’m not going to call the Curry Cops.

Bengan Bhartha - Indian - The Lotus and the Artichoke

Bengan Bhartha – indisches Auberginenpüree

2 Portionen / Zubereitungszeit 45-60 Min.

  • 1 große / 2 mittelgroße Aubergine(n) (ca. 250g)
  • 1 große Tomate gewürfelt
  • 1/2 Zwiebel feingehackt
  • 2-4 Knoblauchzehen
  • 1 cm Ingwer feingehackt
  • 1/2 TL Senfsamen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1 TL Koriandersamen gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Paprikapulver
  • 1 grüne Chilischote feingehackt oder 1/2 TL rote Chiliflocken
  • 1/4 TL  Asafoetida / Hingpulver (auch bekannt unter dem schönen Namen „Teufelsdreck“)
  • 1/2 TL Salz
  • 2-3 EL Öl
  • 2 EL Wasser
  • frische Korianderblätter zum Garnieren
  • 2 große Zitronenspalten (ca. 1/2 Zitrone)
  1. Es gibt zwei Röstmöglichkeiten für Auberginen: Aubergine mit einer Zange ca. 10 -15 Min. direkt in die niedrige Gasflamme halten und ständig drehen, bis die Außenhaut verkohlt und das Fruchtfleisch gar ist. Oder die Aubergine mit Öl einreiben und im Ofen bei 220°C / Stufe 6-7 ca. 45 Min. backen. Bei beiden Methoden die Aubergine vorher mit einer Gabel einstechen. Das Aubergineninnere wird weich und mürbe, wenn es gar ist. Abkühlen lassen, verkohlte Außenhaut abziehen, Fruchtfleisch in Schüssel geben, mit Gabel zu Mus zerdrücken und vermengen.
  2. 2 EL Öl in großem Topf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen zugeben. Wenn diese aufplatzen (nach ca. 30 Sek.) Knoblauch, Zwiebel, Ingwer, Kreuzkümmel, Koriander, Kurkuma, Paprikapulver, Chilischote und Asafoetida hinzugeben. Unter ständigem Rühren ca. 3-5 Min. anbraten bis Zwiebeln und Knoblauch gebräunt sind.
  3. Auberginenmus, Tomate und Salz untermischen. Unter ständigem Rühren 10 Min. auf niedriger Flamme köcheln lassen.
  4. Zwei Tassen Wasser hinzufügen, vermischen, weitere 5 Min. köcheln lassen. Flamme abstellen.
  5. Für ein noch cremigeres Bengan Bhartha das Mus mit einem Stabmixer oder in einer Küchenmaschine fein pürieren. Nach dem Abkühlen wieder in den Topf geben und erwärmen.
  6. Mit Korianderblättern garnieren und mit Zitronenspalten und Chapati, Naan oder Reis servieren.

Variationen:

Kein Fan von Knoblauch und Zwiebeln? Kein Ding – ersetze es einfach mit einer zusätzlichen Tomate und 1 TL Garam Masala.

Continue reading

Green Bean Sweet Potato Tofu Curry

Indo-German: Green Bean Sweet Potato Tofu Curry

The story of some of my best culinary creations goes something like this: I have a dish in mind but either I didn’t go shopping or otherwise don’t have all the ingredients. I look around in the fridge and comb the shelves. At first glance, I’m always doubtful, but within a few minutes I’ve got stuff all over the counter and suddenly I’m feeling far more optimistic.

This curry came into existence on one such evening. Half a block of tofu and half a brick of frozen green beans in the freezer. One tomato left. Two sweet potatoes and a few shallots just chilling in the cupboard. What to do? I wanted something with Indian and Thai flavors but with a slight spin. Fresh thyme! I put on some music and got chopping…

Continue reading