Poha – Indian Breakfast

Poha - Indian Breakfast - The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegan Recipes from World Travel Adventures

On my first two visits to India in the early to mid-2000s, I had idly or dosa for breakfast almost whenever possible. I’m a huge fan of South Indian breakfasts. Unlike most North American and European breakfasts, which tend to be on the sweeter side (think: cereal, toast with jam or even chocolate spread, pastries, muffins, pancakes), Indian breakfasts are typically spicy and savory… and did I mention: delicious?

Amazingly, it wasn’t until my third and fourth trip to India that I got to know the Indian breakfast hit, poha. These kinds of things happen if you’re too focused on your favorite dishes and foods! That’s why it’s so important to try new things. Be open to suggestions, take chances, and enjoy invitations to home cooked meals! I encountered poha so late in the game probably because it’s much more of a family dish – prepared at home kitchens across India. It’s less likely found on restaurant menus. That said, some hotels (code word for restaurant on the sub-continent) and breakfast spots do offer poha.

The best poha I ever had, as with many Indian dishes, was not at a restaurant, but at a home. A very special home in fact, where I was welcomed and treated like family. If you’ve been following my stories on this blog, you know I lived for a year in Amravati, India – deep in the state of Maharashtra. I had amazingly generous and attentive neighbors, and my host family was particularly endearing and kind.

Poha - Indian Breakfast - The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegan Recipes from World Travel Adventures

PohaIndisches Frühstück: Reisflocken mit Kartoffeln & Gewürzen

2 Portionen / Dauer 20 Min.

  • 1 Tasse / 110 g Poha (flache Reisflocken)
  • 1 Tasse / 240 ml Wasser
  • 2 mittelgroße Kartoffeln geschält, klein geschnitten
  • 1 mittelgroße Tomategehackt
  • 2 EL Öl
  • 1 kleine Zwiebel gehackt
  • 1 TL braune Senfsamen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL Paprikapulver
  • 3/4 TL Kurkuma
  • 1 EL Zitronen- oder Limettensaft
  • 1 TL Zucker
  • 1/2 TL Salz
  • 2 EL Cashewkernstückezum Garnieren
  • 2 Zitronen- oder Limettenspaltenzum Garnieren
  • frische Korianderblätter zum Garnieren
  1. Poha-Flocken 5 Min. in einer mit Wasser gefüllten Schüssel einweichen. Überschüssiges Wasser abgießen, Poha beiseite stellen.
  2. In einer großen Pfanne oder einem großen Topf Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen.
  3. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (nach circa 20 Sek.) Zwiebel, Kreuzkümmel, Paprikapulver und Kurkuma hinzufügen. 2-3 Min. braten bis Zwiebelstückchen gebräunt sind.
  4. Kartoffeln hinzufügen. 4-5 Min. braten und häufig wenden.
  5. Auf mittlere Flamme herunterstellen. Tomate zugeben. Gut verrühren und 4-5 Min. braten, bis die Kartoffeln außen knusprig und innen weich sind.
  6. Poha, Zitronensaft, Zucker und Salz hinzufügen. Gut mischen und 2-3 Min. unter vorsichtigem Rühren weiter garen. Falls das Poha zu trocken ist, nach und nach kleinere Mengen Wasser hinzufügen und kurz zum Dünsten abdecken.
  7. Flamme abstellen. Pfanne abdecken. Einige Minuten ziehen lassen.
  8. Mit Cashewkernstücken und frischen Korianderblättern garnieren. Mit Zitronenspalten servieren.

Variationen:

Vedisch: Zwiebel mit einer Prise Asofoetida ersetzen. Gemüse: Zusammen mit den Kartoffeln 1/2 Tasse Erbsen, grüne Bohnen, gehackte Möhren oder grüne Paprika hinzufügen. Aromatischer: 3-4 Curry-Blätter, 1/2 TL Garam Masala, 1/2 TL gemahlenen Koriander, 1 TL gehackten frischen Ingwer und 1/2 TL rote Chiliflocken oder 1 klein geschnittene scharfe Chilischote zu den anderen Gewürzen hinzufügen. Fruchtig: 2 EL Rosinen oder gehackte Datteln zusammen mit der Tomate zugeben. Südindisch mit Kokosnuss: In den letzten Kochminuten 1-2 EL frische oder getrocknete Kokosraspel unterrühren.

 

 

Poha (rice flakes) and the packaging - Available at most Asian / Indian spice shops

Poha (rice flakes) are available at most Indian and some Asian grocery shops and supermarkets.

Continue reading

Vegan Lassi with Saffron & Mango

Indian: Vegan Lassi with Saffron and Mango - The Lotus and the Artichoke - World Travel Vegan Recipes

Many years ago, on my first India trip, I stayed for several days in the city of Jaipur – The Pink City of Rajasthan. I recall walking for hours, mesmerized by the people and the loud colors and fantastic, flowing saris and shirts. I was constantly taking photographs. I remember riding with insane auto-rickshaw drivers along the crowded, dusty streets, weaving around pedestrians, bicycles, beggars, and cows. Just like in all the books and movies.

I’d only been in India for a few weeks at that point, and I was still very much in New Arrival Mode: The first two to four weeks of being in India – everything is an overwhelming assault on the senses. You’re in near-constant amazement at how wild and vivid life can be. The circus and overloaded charm fade (somewhat) after a few weeks, but usually one or more things happen every day that remind you: you’re in a very different world.

Next to only perhaps seeing the Hawa Mahal, and trekking around some of the old forts, my favorite experience in Jaipur was at a small café that was famous for their saffron lassi. I remember retreating from the hot sun into the shade with my journal and heavily marked-up guidebook, sliding my tired self into a plastic chair, and sipping this amazing, glowing, pink-orange chilled treat. The flavor was intense, exotic, new to me. That fresh saffron lassi straight from the fridge was the best thing in that moment. I contemplated how many I would need to order and drink before it would be too much. I stayed long enough to need a second one, and then got on my way of exploring the streets further.

For something so simple, it’s hard to believe it took me so many years to figure out how to make a good lassi. The secret is the right combination of soy yogurt, water, and ice cubes. I think I’ve got it down good now, so I’m ready to pass on the recipe for my all-vegan rendition of the Indian classic yogurt shake.

Indian: Vegan Lassi with Saffron and Mango - The Lotus and the Artichoke - World Travel Vegan Recipes

Safran-Mango-Lassi – Indischer Joghurtdrink

2 Portionen / Dauer 15 Min.+

  • 1 Tasse / 235 g Sojajoghurt (Vanillegeschmack oder natur)
  • 1/2 Tasse / 110 g frische Mango gehackt
    oder Mangofruchtmark
  • 4 Eiswürfel
  • 1–2 EL Zucker oder Agavensirup (je nach Joghurtsüße anpassen)
  • 1/4 TL Rosenwasser wenn gewünscht
  • 1 Prise Kardamom gemahlen wenn gewünscht
  • 6 Safranfäden
  • 1/4 Tasse / 60 ml Wasser
  • Minzblätter zum Garnieren
  1. 1/4 Tasse (60 ml) Wasser kochen und in eine kleine Schüssel gießen. Safranfäden ins heiße Wasser geben und 30 Min. einweichen.
  2. In einer kleinen Küchenmaschine oder mit einem Stabmixer Sojajoghurt, Mango, Eiswürfel, Zucker, Rosenwasser und Kardamom fein pürieren.
  3. Safran und Wasser (oder nur das Wasser) hinzufügen und nochmals glatt pürieren. Je nach Konsistenz ggf. etwas mehr Wasser hinzufügen.
  4. Eine Stunde kalt stellen.
  5. In gekühlten Gläsern mit frischen Minzblättchen garniert servieren.

Variationen:
Ohne Safran: Schritt 1 weglassen, kaltes Wasser bei Schritt 3 verwenden. Ohne Rosenwasser oder Kardamom: Zugegebenermaßen nicht jedermanns Sache, also einfach weglassen. Salzig statt süß: Schritt 1 weglassen und auf Mango, Zucker und Rosenwasser verzichten. Kaltes Wasser und puren Joghurt verwenden, eine Prise Salz und gemahlenen Kreuzkümmel hinzufügen. Mit einem Klecks aus einem Mix aus Tamarindenpaste und Agaven- oder Ahornsirup krönen. Continue reading

Masoor Dal

Masoor Dal - Indian Red Lentils recipe - The Lotus and the Artichoke vegan cookbook

Masoor Dal, or Indian red lentil curry, is one of the most classic dal recipes and a standard and favorite all across India — and the world. It accompanies almost any excellent Indian meal, and goes well with rice, chapati, naan, roti and all of your favorite breads. You can even serve it in a bowl with crackers or croutons and be a true East-West fusion superstar.

There are endless variations on this dal recipe. The tomato is optional but improves the flavor dramatically, going well to smooth the Indian spices and compliment the fresh ginger. Many Indian cooks make an even simpler, stripped-down version of dal, relying only on the key spices: cumin, coriander, and turmeric — possibly with a dash of garam masala. The smooth texture is obtained by cooking the lentils long enough that they literally fall apart. You can speed things up with an immersion blender, as noted below. (You might need to start with less water, as immersion blending a  hot, liquidy soup is a messy and dangerous matter.)

Even when cooking non-Vedic, I do use asafoetida and mustard seeds. Many Indian lentil and bean dishes just don’t need the strong garlic and onion flavors, especially if one or more vegetable dish you’re serving with the meal does rely on garlic and onion. Garlic quickly overpowers other tastes. I encourage you to experiment with less – or even none – and discover the true flavors of the more exotic spices.

With some practice it’s quick and simple to make and perfect when you want a nutritious meal and haven’t got much in the kitchen. You do always keep plenty of lentils, spices, and rice, right? Exactly.Masoor Dal - Indian Red Lentils recipe - The Lotus and the Artichoke vegan cookbook

Masoor DalIndische Rote-Linsen-Suppe

4 Portionen / Dauer 60 Min.

  • 3/4 Tasse / 125 g rote Linsen
  • 1 mittelgroße Tomate gehackt
  • 5 Tassen / 1200 ml Wasser
  • 2 EL Öl
  • 1 Knoblauchzehe fein gehackt
  • 1 kleine Zwiebel oder Schalotte fein gehackt
  • 2 cm Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 TL braune Senfsamen
  • 2 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1 TL Koriandersamen gemahlen
  • 3/4 TL Kurkuma
  • 1 kleine grüne Chilischote klein geschnitten oder 1/2 TL rote Chiliflocken
  • 1 Prise Asafoetida
  • 1 kleines Stück Zimtstange oder 1/4 TL Zimt gemahlen
  • 1 Lorbeerblatt
  • 3/4 TL Salz
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft
  • frische Korianderblätter oder getrocknete Bockshornkleeblätter zum Garnieren
  • Paprikapulver zum Garnieren
  1. Linsen spülen und abgießen. In einem großen Topf oder Schnellkocher 4 Tassen (960 ml) Wasser zum Kochen bringen. Linsen und gehackte Tomate hinzufügen. Flamme niedrig stellen und 15–25 Min. zugedeckt köcheln, bis die Linsen weich sind.
  2. In einer kleinen Pfanne 2 EL Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (nach 20–30 Sek.) Knoblauch, Zwiebel, Ingwer, gemahlenen Koriander, Kreuzkümmel,
    Chili und Asafoetida zugeben. 3 Min. unter ständigem Rühren anbraten.
  3. Die angebratenen Gewürze, Knoblauch und Zwiebeln sowie das Lorbeerblatt, Kurkuma, Zimt und
    Salz zu den Linsen geben.
  4. Halb abgedeckt 10 Min. köcheln lassen und gelegentlich umrühren. Je nach gewünschter Konsistenz Wasser hinzufügen.
  5. Zimtstange und Lorbeerblatt herausnehmen. Zitronensaft unterrühren.
  6. Mit Paprikapulver und Koriander– oder Bockshornkleeblättern garnieren. Mit Reis, Naan- oder Chapati-Brot servieren.

Variationen:
Vedisch: Zwiebel und Knoblauch weglassen, 1/4 TL Asafoetida verwenden. Evtl. 1/2 TL Garam Masala zugeben. Cremig: 1 EL Margarine und 1/2 Tasse (120 ml) Sojasahne oder Kokosmilch statt Wasser am Ende hinzufügen. Mehr Gemüse: Je 1 Tasse (etwa 70 g) gehackte Möhren und Kartoffeln nach den ersten 10 Kochminuten zu den Linsen geben. Wassermenge nach Bedarf anpassen. Continue reading

Vegan Dal Makhani

Dal Makhani

All across India and in Indian restaurants around the world this popular dish is easy to find — in dozens of different colors, styles, textures, and tastes. My favorite is a Punjabi variety, from the region of Northwest India bordering on and including what is now Pakistan, the origin of many Sindhi and Sikh communities, including those I lived among in Amravati (Maharashtra) in 2010-11. Ten years earlier, in Amritsar I had some really good stuff. I remember delicious ones in Rajasthan, too. Heck, my favorite Pakistani place down the street here in Berlin makes it excellent, too. This is what I’ve come up with in my own kitchens after years of tinkering and trials with lots of different recipes and suggestions.

Dal Makhani

Vegan Dal Makhani – Nordindisches Bohnencurry

4 Portionen / Zubereitungszeit ca. 80 Min. (+ Einweichzeit)

  • 1 Tasse schwarze Bohnen getrocknet
  • 1/4 Tasse Kidneybohnen getrocknet
  • 1 1/2 Tassen Tomaten püriert oder gewürfelt (ca. 2 große Tomaten)
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen feingehackt
  • 1 TL Ingwer sehr fein gehackt
  • 2 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Garam Masala
  • 1 1/2 TL Salz
  • 1-2 EL Öl
  • 3 1/2 Tassen Wasser
  • 1/2 Tassen Sojamilch oder Sojasahne  (kann, muss nicht)
  • 1 TL Zitronensaft (ca. 1/4 Zitrone)
  • Korianderblätter oder getrocknete Bockshornkleeblätter zum Garnieren
  1. Bohnen gut spülen, abtropfen lassen, reichlich Wasser nachgießen und über Nacht einweichen.
  2. Bohnen abtropfen lassen und in großem Topf oder Schnellkocher mit 3 1/2 Tassen frischem Wasser zum Kochen bringen.
  3. Auf kleiner Flamme zugedeckt ca. 50 Min. kochen bis die Bohnen weich sind.
  4. In kleiner Pfanne Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen und Knoblauch, Ingwer und Gewürze 2-3 Min. anbraten bis der Knoblauch leicht gebräunt ist. Flamme abstellen und Zitronensaft in Pfanne träufeln.
  5. Die angebratenen Gewürze aus der kleinen Pfanne und das Tomatenpüree in den großen Topf zu den Bohnen geben. Ordentlich mischen, auf mittlerer Flamme ohne Deckel ca. 15 Min. köcheln lassen und gelegentlich umrühren.
  6. Salz und Sojasahne (wenn erwünscht) unterrühren. Weitere 10-15 Min. auf mittlerer Flamme bei gelegentlichem Umrühren köcheln. Wenn die Konsistenz stimmt, ist es fertig!
  7. Mit getrockneten Bockshornkleeblettern oder gehackten Korianderblättern garnieren und mit Basmati-Reis oder Chapati servieren.

Variationen: Für ein bisschen Zungenbrennen das Dal Makhani mit 1 oder 2 feingehackten grünen oder roten Chilischoten oder ½ TL roten Chiliflocken veredeln. Der Knoblauch kann mit  1/4 TL Asafoetida (Hingpulver) ersetzt oder ergänzt werden. Eilige können für dieses Rezept auch Konservenbohnen und –tomaten nehmen: 1 Dose schwarze Bohnen, 1 Dose Kidneybohnen, 1 Dose Tomatenstücke oder Tomatenpüree. Die Dosenbohnen abtropfen lassen und 3 statt 4 Tassen Wasser zum Kochen verwenden.

Continue reading