Penang Laksa

Penang Laksa Noodle Soup

Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos.

Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang!

Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes.

That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived – with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs – and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this…

Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh – spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it.

A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive.

There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe!

Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal.

Penang Laksa

classic Malaysian noodle soup

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

serves 2 to 3 / time 45 min

  • 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced
  • 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced
  • 1/3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped
  • 1 Tbs vegetable oil 
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce
  • 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked)
  • 2 1/2 cups (600 ml) water 
  • 2/3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk 
  • 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest 
  • fresh mint leaves chopped
  • fresh coriander leaves chopped
  • fresh thai basil leaves chopped
  • bean sprouts for garnish

laksa spice paste:

  • 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained
  • 1 stalk lemongrass chopped
  • 1/2–1 large red chili chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic chopped
  • 1 shallot chopped
  • 3/4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped
  • 1/2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color)
  • 1/2 tsp fennel seed ground
  • 1/2 tsp coriander ground
  • 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup 
  • 3/4 tsp sea salt 
  • 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless)
  • 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice 
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil 
  1. If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions.
  2. Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth.
  3. Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3–5 min.
  4. Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2–3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2–3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl.
  5. Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3–5 min.
  6. Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3–5 min.
  7. Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve.
  8. Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve.

My first Laksa in Penang, Malaysia

Penang Laksa - Instagram

Penang Laksa Malaysian Noodle Soup by The Lotus and the Artichoke - Instagram (Jan 2017)

Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

(available as printed cookbook & ebook – in English & German)

Malaysia vegan cookbook cover blockprint

Penang Laksa Noodle Soup

Penang Laksa

klassische malaysische Nudelsuppe

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

2 bis 3 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

  • 150 g Seitan in Scheiben geschnitten
  • 100 g Räuchertofu in Scheiben geschnitten
  • 1/3 Tasse (45 g) Ananas gehackt
  • 1 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 EL Sojasoße oder Vegane Fischsoße
  • 200 g gekochte Udon-Nudeln
    oder 100 g trockene Udon gemäß Packungsanweisung gekocht, abgegossen
  • 2 1/2 Tassen (600 ml) Wasser
  • 2/3 Tasse (150 ml) Kokosmilch
  • 1 Kaffirlimettenblätter oder 1 TL Limettenabrieb
  • frische Minzblätter gehackt
  • frische Korianderblätter gehackt
  • frische Thaibasilikumblätter gehackt
  • Bohnensprossen zum Garnieren

Laksa-Gewürzpaste:

  • 4 Keriminüsse oder 2 EL Cashewkerne in heißem Wasser eingeweicht, abgegossen
  • 1 Stängel Zitronengras gehackt
  • 1/2–1 große rote Chilischote gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen gehackt
  • 1 Schalotte gehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Galgant oder Ingwer gehackt
  • 1/2 TL Paprikapulver (nach Bedarf mehr, fürs Rot)
  • 1/2 TL Fenchelsamen gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 2 TL Kokosblütenzucker oder Agavensirup
  • 3/4 TL Meersalz
  • 1 TL Tamarindenpaste (ohne Samen)
  • 2 EL Limetten– oder Zitronensaft
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  1. Zutaten für die Gewürzpaste in einer kleinen Küchenmaschine glatt pürieren.
  2. In einem großen Topf oder Wok 1 EL Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Seitan– und Räuchertofuscheiben hineingeben. 3 bis 5 Minuten unter mehrmaligem Wenden braten, bis die Ränder braun und knusprig sind.
  3. Gehackte Ananas einrühren. 2 bis 3 weitere Min. braten. Sojasoße oder Vegane Fischsoße unterrühren. Weitere 2 bis 3 Min. braten. Auf einen Teller oder in eine Schüssel geben.
  4. Wok oder Topf erneut erhitzen. Gewürzpaste 3 bis 5 Min. Unter ständigem Rühren darin braten, bis sie dunkel wird und das Öl beginnt, sich zu trennen.
  5. Kaffirlimettenblätter oder Limettenabrieb und nach und nach Wasser und Kokosmilch einrühren. Zum Köcheln bringen. Gekochte Udon-Nudeln hineingeben und erneut zum Köcheln bringen. Nudeln 3 bis 5 Min. kochen, bis sie leicht weich sind.
  6. Seitan, Tofu und Ananas einrühren. Flamme abstellen. Bis zum Servieren abgedeckt ziehen lassen.
  7. Suppe und Nudeln in Schüsseln anrichten. Mit Kräutern und Bohnensprossen garnieren und servieren.
Penang Laksa - Instagram
Penang Laksa Malaysian Noodle Soup by The Lotus and the Artichoke - Instagram (Jan 2017)

Vegan Rezept für Penang Laksa aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

 The Lotus and the Artichoke - MALAYSIA cookbook cover

Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup

Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup - The Lotus and the Artichoke vegan cookbook

I’ve been making variations of this vegan Carrot Ginger soup recipe for over ten years. The inspiration came from a former co-worker from South Africa that I met while working as an English teacher with Berlitz Language School in my early years in Berlin. The recipe she gave me after a dinner party was for Carrot Ginger Pumpkin soup. I’ve modified it over the years to include potato (for a vegan creamy texture) and use soy milk instead of cream. I often use other vegetables (in this case zucchini) instead of pumpkin.

I love to cook with what I have in the kitchen, and I change up this soup accordingly all the time. This is an all-year soup that you can vary in thickness and spice according to weather and whim. Like thicker soups? Easy: add less water. Not in the mood for thick wintery soup? No trouble: increase the water and/or soy milk slightly. It’s also easy to make a more Indian version by increasing the appropriate spices, and I’ve even turned this into a sort of dal (lentil) fusion soup using a cup or two of boiled red lentils along with the vegetables before puréeing. If you want a more European and less Asian soup, replace the cumin and coriander with fresh thyme, basil, rosemary and add some tomato paste or 1 chopped tomato.

This soup works great as a starter served along with a healthy salad (such as my Arugula Pear Walnut salad favorite) warming up to a nice, hearty meal. It impresses guests every time and everyone always asks for more. You can double the soup and have enough for several days (you won’t get bored of it, especially if you have plenty of good bread, tasty crackers, or your own tasty croutons.) It can also be frozen and kept for a quick, delicious future meal when you’re too lazy to cook.

Do you have any other suggestions or ideas? Share your thoughts and experiences!

Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup - The Lotus and the Artichoke vegan cookbook

Möhren-Ingwer-Zucchini Suppe

4 Portionen / Zubereitungszeit 30 Min.

  • 3 mittelgroße / 3 Tassen Möhren geschält, kleingeschnitten
  • 3 mittelgroße / 3 Tassen Kartoffeln geschält, kleingeschnitten
  • 1 mittelgroße / 2 Tassen Zucchini kleingeschnitten
  • 1 kleine rote Zwiebel oder 1 Schalotte gehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer feingeschnitten
  • 1-2 Knoblauchzehen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/8 TL Muskatnuss
  • 1 EL Gemüsebrühepulver
  • 1 EL Nährhefe (Hefeflocken) AUF WUNSCH
  • 1/2 TL schwarzer Pfeffer geschrotet
  • 1/2 TL Paprikapulver
  • 1/2 TL Salz
  • 2 EL Olivenöl
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1/4 Tasse Weißwein (oder Wasser)
  • 1 Tasse Sojamilch
  • 3 Tassen Wasser
  1. Öl in großem Topf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Knoblauch, Zwiebel, Ingwer, Pfeffer, Kreuzkümmel, Koriander, Paprikapulver, Kurkuma und Muskatnuss hineingeben. Vermischen und ca. 3 Min. anbraten bis Knoblauch und Zwiebeln leicht gebräunt sind.
  2. Möhren, Kartoffeln und Zucchini hinzufügen. Gut mit den Gewürzen vermischen und 5 Min. anbraten.
  3. Zitronensaft und Wein zugießen. Regelmäßig umrühren und halb bedeckt 5-7 Min. köcheln lassen bis das Gemüse weich und gar ist.
  4. Flamme abdrehen / Topf zur Seite stellen. Gemüse mit Pürierstab zerkleinern bis das Ganze cremig wird.
  5. Zurück auf mittlere Flamme stellen. Sojamilch, Gemüsebrühepulver, Hefeflocken und Salz hinzufügen. Gut umrühren und 2-3 Min. köcheln lassen.
  6. Nach und nach Wasser zugeben, regelmäßig umrühren und auf kleiner Flamme 5 Min. weiterkochen.
  7. Jetzt auf mittlerer Flamme köcheln bis die erwünschte Konsistenz erreicht ist.
  8. Mit frischer Petersilie, zerkleinerten Nüssen, Paprikapulver und geschrotetem Pfeffer garnieren. Mit Brot oder Crackern servieren.

Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup - The Lotus and the Artichoke vegan cookbook

Variationen:

Auf vedische Art (kein Knoblauch, keine Zwiebeln): mit einer Prise Asafoetida (Hingpulver) und ½ TL braunen Senfsamen ausgleichen. Für nussigen Geschmack: 1/4 Tasse leicht geröstete Sonnenblumenkerne zusammen mit den Hefeflocken und dem Brühepulver hinzugeben. Klassisch nur mit Möhren und Ingwer: 2 oder 3 weitere Möhren anstatt der Zucchini verwenden. Oder die Zucchini mit 1 oder 2 Tassen kleingeschnittenem Kürbis ersetzen. Statt Kartoffeln kannst du Süßkartoffeln oder mehr Möhren nehmen. Europäische Kräutermischung: Nimm frisches Basilikum, Thymian und Rosmarin anstatt Kreuzkümmel und Koriander. Für einen volleren und fruchtigeren Geschmack 1 EL Tomatenmark oder eine gehackte Tomate hinzufügen.

  Continue reading