E-Book Master Collection SALE!

Just for a quick minute…

I‘ve got a SALE on my E-BOOK MASTER COLLECTION!

The Master Collection includes: The Lotus and the ArtichokeWORLD 2.0, MEXICO, SRI LANKA, MALAYSIA, INDIA, ETHIOPIA & my *New* INDOCHINESE cookbook!

  • Over 500 recipes tested and enjoyed by thousands of readers in over 50 countries!
  • All 7 of my cookbooks in digital format
  • English or Deutsch language editions. (If you’d like both, send me a message after purchase and I’ll send you free download links for the other language edition!)
  • 2023 updated editions – I’ve revised and corrected all of my e-books!
  • PDFs with *no* DRM (digital rights management)
  • fully unlocked so you can print recipes
  • install the e-books on as many devices in your household as you like! I trust you!
  • Works great on: iPhone, Android & other smartphones, iPads, Samsung and other tablets, Kindle Fire and other e-readers, & Macbooks, iMacs, PCs, notebooks & desktop computers, etc.

Only for a limited time:

Get my E-Book Master Collection for only €24 with the promo code: NYE2024

The E-Book Master Collection includes my new INDOCHINESE cookbook!

Indian Masterclass

In December 2021 I was invited to go to Munich for a week of intense filming with the incredible Vegan Masterclass team. We filmed over 30 videos dedicated to my favorite country & cuisine – INDIA!

The Indian Masterclass is now online

…and now I can share with you my passion and experience. Currently the entire course is in German, but I’ll be posting lots of content (especially on Instagram but also new recipes, photos, and videos here) in English.

Although I’ve been cooking Indian food for almost 30 years and speaking German for over 20, making this Masterclass was one of the most challenging (and rewarding) experiences in my life and career. I’d rank it right up there with the adventure of living and working in Amravati (Maharashtra) India for a year, teaching Art and English at an international school. It was definitely a peak achievement which puts a shiny crown on my move to Berlin, Germany in September 2001, and the 8 months of German language courses!

photos by Hansi Heckmair

I’d like to dedicate this Indian Masterclass to all of the generous and brilliant friends, families, and masters of Indian cooking that have inspired me and led me on my own journey of discovery and delights. In my ten trips to India I have spent countless hours in kitchens of homes and restaurants, at street food vendors, and devoured unforgettable meals in every corner of the subcontinent. I’ve learnt so much, but I’m always still learning — and never shy to share my appreciation, love, and excitement.

(I’ve been back to India twice since I made this graphic… in 2018 and 2019 with my family!)

In my cookbooks and in the Indian Masterclass video series, I talk a lot about the individuals that have guided and inspired me, and there are many (wacky and wild) stories from my journals about my adventures – in the kitchen and beyond.

This course dives deep into the theory and magic of (mostly) North and South Indian cooking, but we must remember that these are very broad and general strokes attempting to classify and unimaginable breadth of different cuisines, techniques, traditions, and ideas. India offers an incredible wealth and diversity of foods and culinary ways, and many are underrepresented in cookbooks and courses. I hope to expand this Masterclass series in the future to include many other Indian cuisines, including Northeastern and more specific subcategories of Northern, Southern, and West Indian traditions.

I also address the concept of authenticity and ownership in my cookbooks, but it’s necessary for me to drop a few lines here, too: You can’t really cross the street or turn around in India without a new voice challenging the authenticity and correctness of any particular dish or spice mix. Debates on what does or does not belong in a dish, or which shape something must be, are very common and all part of the regional, community, family traditions, woven intricately into the cultural fabric, history, and interpretations. I will never claim to know all the secrets or have the most ‘authentic‘ recipe for anything, whether Indian cooking or otherwise. My recipes are the result of my very best efforts to repeat and reflect the traditions and culinary wonder shared with me. I always encourage you to explore and learn deeper and focus on appreciation and enjoyment.

Outside India it is not always possible to stay absolutely true to ingredients and methods as I’ve learned them, but I always try to address adaptations and modifications meant to render the recipes more accessible and practical on other continents and for a variety of audiences and cooks of all skill levels.

I promise you that my cookbooks and this Masterclass will offer you – and your loved ones – some of the most thorough, heartfelt, and sincere explorations of Indian cooking you’re likely to find outside of India. I’m always open to feedback and would love to hear your thoughts!

Here are some preview and promotional videos and photos from the course and also the obligatory (German) marketing text fun! :-)

Die indische Küche ist ein Traum für Gemüsefans! Sie überrascht mit einer Vielfalt an Geschmacksrichtungen, Aromen und Gewürzen. Traditionelle Köstlichkeiten aus der süd- und nordindischen Küche. 

Egal ob herzhafte Fladenbrote wie Chapati oder Naan, oder aromatische Currys wie Chana Masala oder Palak Paneer – lass dich überraschen von der Raffinesse, den duftenden Gewürzkombinationen und den regionalen Delikatessen. Indien bietet ein Schatz voller Köstlichkeiten!

Aktionspreise (11.03 – 27.03.2022)

  • Preis für den Einzelkurs Indian Masterclass: 49€
  • Jährliche Mitgliedschaft: nur 14,99€ pro Monat
    (12 Monate Mindestlaufzeit, danach monatlich kündbar)

The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA cookbook & e-book are available in English and in German!

To celebrate the launch of my Indian Masterclass, last night I cooked Malai Kofta for the family! It’s one of my favorite recipes from my INDIA cookbook!

Malai Kofta

Malai Kofta

Malai Kofta
North Indian potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry 

serves 3 to 4 / time 45 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

  • 3/4 cup (90 g) cashews
  • 1 1/4 cup (300 ml) water
  • 2 Tbs lemon juice

  • 2 medium (250 g) potatoes
  • 1/3 cup (30 g) chickpea flour (besan) 
  • 3 Tbs (20 g) bread crumbs
  • 2 Tbs corn starch
  • 3/4 tsp cumin ground
  • 1/2 tsp Garam Masala (page 32, INDIA cookbook)
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • vegetable oil for frying

  • 2 large (250 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 1 1/4 cup (300 ml) water
  • 1 small (70 g) red onion chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1 in (3 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped

  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp cumin ground
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1/2 tsp Garam Masala (page 32, INDIA cookbook)
  • 1/2 tsp red chili powder or paprika ground
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing) powder
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 large cinnamon stick
  • or 1/4 tsp cinnamon ground 
  • 1 black cardamom pod
  • 3/4 tsp turmeric ground
  • 3/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup
  • 1/2 cup (65 g) green peas
  • 3 Tbs golden raisins
  • fresh coriander leaves chopped, for garnish
  1. Soak cashews in hot water 20 min. Drain and discard water. Blend soaked cashews with 1 1/4 cup (300 ml) fresh water and lemon juice until smooth, 60–90 sec. Transfer to bowl. Set aside.
  2. Cover potatoes with water in a medium pot. Bring to boil. Cook until soft, 20–25 min. Rinse in cold water. Remove, discard peels. Mash potatoes in a large bowl. Add 2 Tbs blended cashew cream, chickpea flour, bread crumbs, corn starch, ground cumin, garam masala, and salt. Mix well.
  3. Heat oil about 2 in (5 cm) deep in small pot on medium high heat. Oil is hot enough when a small piece of batter sizzles and comes to surface immediately.
  4. Wet hands and form walnut-sized balls from the batter. Carefully add 4 to 6 balls to hot oil. Fry until golden brown, turning often, 3–5 min.  If balls turn brown immediately or oil is smoking, reduce heat. If they don’t sizzle and darken in 2 min, increase heat slightly. Using a slotted spoon, drain and transfer fried dumplings to a plate. Continue for all balls.
  5. Blend chopped tomatoes and 1 1/4 cup (300 ml) water until mostly smooth.
  6. Heat 2 Tbs oil in a large pot or wok on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to
    pop (20–30 sec), add chopped onion, garlic, ginger, ground cumin, coriander, garam masala, red chili powder (or paprika), bay leaves, cinnamon, and cardamom. Fry until onions soften,
    stirring constantly, 3–5 min. 
  7. Add blended tomatoes. Bring to boil. Simmer until sauce darkens, stirring regularly, 10–12 min.
  8. Stir in blended cashew cream, turmeric, salt, and sugar (or agave syrup). Continue to simmer, stirring regularly, until sauce thickens and oil begins to separate from sauce another 7–10 min.
  9. Stir in fried dumplings, peas, and raisins. Simmer on medium low, partially covered, stirring occasionally, 3–5 min. Remove from heat.
  10. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves and serve with rice, roti, or naan.

Malai Kofta
nordindische Kartoffelbällchen in cremigem Tomaten-Curry 

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIEN

  • 3/4 Tasse (90 g) Cashewkerne
  • 1 1/4 Tasse (300 ml) Wasser
  • 2 EL Zitronensaft

  • 2 mittelgroße (250 g) Kartoffeln
  • 1/3 Tasse (30 g) Kichererbsenmehl (Besan)
  • 3 EL (20 g) Semmelbrösel
  • 2 EL Speisestärke
  • 3/4 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Garam Masala (Seite 32)
  • 1/2 TL Meersalz
  • Pflanzenöl zum Frittieren

  • 2 große (250 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 1 1/4 Tasse (300 ml) Wasser
  • 1 kleine (70 g) rote Zwiebel gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL Senfsamen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Garam Masala
  • 1/2 TL Chili- oder Paprikapulver
  • 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Hingpulver)
  • 2 Lorbeerblätter
  • 1 große Zimtstange
  • oder 1/4 TL Zimt gemahlen
  • 1 schwarze Kardamomkapsel
  • 3/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Meersalz
  • 1 TL Zucker oder Agavensirup
  • 1/2 Tasse (65 g) grüne Erbsen
  • 2–3 EL Sultaninen
  • frisches Koriandergrün gehackt
  1. Cashewkerne 20 Min. in heißem Wasser einweichen. Abgießen und Einweichwasser wegschütten. Eingeweichte Cashewkerne mit 1 1/4 Tasse (300 ml) frischem Wasser und Zitronensaft 60 bis 90 Sek. im Mixer glatt pürieren. In eine Schüssel geben und beiseite stellen.
  2. Kartoffeln in einen Topf geben und mit Wasser bedecken. Zum Kochen bringen und 20 bis 25 Min. weichkochen. Abgießen, mit kaltem Wasser abschrecken und schälen. In eine große Schüssel geben und zerdrücken. 2 EL der Cashewcreme, Kichererbsenmehl, Semmelbrösel, Speisestärke, gemahlenen Kreuzkümmel, Garam Masala und Salz hinzufügen und alles gut vermischen.
  3. Öl 5 cm hoch in einen kleinen Topf geben und auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Das Öl ist heiß genug, wenn eine kleine Menge Teig nach dem Hineingeben brutzelt und an die Oberfläche steigt.
  4. Hände befeuchten und aus der Kartoffelmischung walnussgroße Bällchen formen. Vorsichtig 4 bis 6 Bällchen ins heiße Öl geben. 3 bis 5 Min. unter häufigem Wenden goldbraun frittieren. Werden die Bällchen sofort dunkel oder raucht das Öl, die Hitze reduzieren. Wenn sie nicht brutzeln und nicht innerhalb von 2 Min. bräunen, Flamme höherstellen. Bällchen mit einem Schaumlöffel herausheben, abtropfen lassen und auf einen Teller legen. Restliche Kofta frittieren.
  5. Gehackte Tomaten und 1 1/4 Tasse (300 ml) Wasser fast glatt pürieren.
  6. In einem großen Topf oder Wok 2 El Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) gehackte Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Ingwer, gemahlenen Kreuzkümmel, Koriander, Garam Masala, Chilipulver (oder Paprikapulver), Lorbeerblätter, Zimt und Kardamom hinzufügen. 3 bis 5 Min. unter ständigem Rühren rösten, bis die Zwiebel weich ist.
  7. Tomatenmix zugießen und zum Kochen bringen. Flamme herunterstellen und 10 bis 12 Min. unter regelmäßigem Rühren köcheln, bis die Soße dunkler wird.
  8. Cashewcreme, Kurkuma, Salz und Zucker (oder Agavensirup) einrühren. Weitere 7 bis 10 Min. unter regelmäßigem Rühren köcheln, bis die Soße eindickt.
  9. Kartoffelbällchen, Erbsen und Sultaninen hineingeben. 3 bis 5 Min. halb abgedeckt auf niedriger Flamme unter gelegentlichem Rühren köcheln. Vom Herd nehmen.
  10. Mit gehacktem Koriandergrün garnieren und mit Reis, Roti oder Naan servieren.

Vegan French Toast

Vegan French Toast

Sometimes it’s hard to believe, but I’ve been making vegan French Toast for over thirty years. My earliest attempts were back when I was a newbie teenage vegan, back in the early ’90s. In fact, there was a recipe for French Toast in Solace Kitchenzine, a cut & pasted, photocopied old-school fanzine with a collection of vegan recipes that I self-published when I was only 17 years old.

I only ever made 500 copies of Solace Kitchenzine, it only had about 20 recipes (and a lot of my drawings and black and white photographs) – but I sold, traded, and distributed all of them – at hardcore punk / straightedge shows, at high school in the New Jersey suburbs, and (mostly) in the domestic and international post. I mailed them out all over the world to other kids that collected ‘zines.

I’ve actually only got a few more copies of my ‘zines. It’s fun to pull them out, put one of my few remaining Gorilla Biscuits or Youth of Today 12″ records on the turntable… and think amusingly about the old days.

Solace Kitchenzine - Vegan French Toast - 1992

The recipe has come a long way since the 1990s. I’ve got decades more cooking experience and a lot more tricks in my culinary arsenal. Instead of just chickpea flour (which Indians have been using for egg-like dishes for ages, and I learned to use like a boss while living in India) I also like to use corn starch or (freshly) ground flax seeds in the batter – to help bind it. I also typically include some Kala Namak, Indian black salt, for that characteristic egg flavor.

As noted, stale bread is best for French Toast. I’ll usually leave the bread slices out the night before I want to make this. Or just use bread that’s been hanging out in the kitchen for a while.

Depending what I’ve got around and how motivated I’m feeling, I may or may not use ground nutmeg, or add some ground vanilla (or vanilla extract), but it does make things more fun. Back in the old days I liked to use Vanilla Edensoy or Vitasoy soy milk (there weren’t 50 brands of plant-based milks at the supermarket or health food stores decades ago).

I originally learned to make French Toast from my dad, who often made breakfast for the family on the weekends. (I also learned to make pancakes and scrambled eggs from him – all of these things I’ve been making vegan for literally most of my life now.) Btw, vegan recipes for Pancakes and Tofu Scramble are in The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0, if you need more vegan brunch ideas.

Yes, lots of recipes are on this website for free, but I’ll just say that when you download my e-books and order my printed cookbooks, it really brightens my days – and helps keep this project going – and puts food on the table for my family here in Berlin. ;-)

Top your fried toast slices with some fresh fruit and a decent syrup of your choice. I think maple syrup is best, but agave syrup or blackstrap molasses are also fun. And, powdered sugar always makes French Toast extra special.

French Toast

serves 2 to 3 / time 30 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

  • 6–8 slices of bread (slightly stale is ideal)
  • 2 Tbs chickpea flour or wheat flour (all-purpose / type 550)
  • 2 Tbs corn starch or 2 Tbs flax seeds ground
  • 1 Tbs sugar
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp kala namak optional
  • 1 cup (240 ml) soy milk
  • 1 Tbs vegetable oil more as needed

toppings:

  • fresh fruit (e.g. sliced banana, pineapple, mango, or berries)
  • margarine
  • powdered sugar, syrup, or fruit jam
  1. Combine chickpea flour (or flour), corn starch (or ground flax seeds), sugar, baking powder,
    ground cinnamon, nutmeg, turmeric, salt, and kala namak (if using) in a large bowl.
  2. Whisk in soy milk and oil. Mix until mostly smooth, but don’t overdo it. Let sit 10 min.
  3. Heat a large non-stick frying pan on medium to medium high heat. When a drop of water sizzles and dances on the surface, the pan is hot enough. (If not using a non-stick frying pan, rub a few drops of oil over the surface with a paper towel before frying each slice.)
  4. Dip a slice of bread in batter on both sides. Let it soak for a few seconds, then transfer it to the hot pan. Repeat for another slice or two. Fry slices on each side for 3–4 minutes until deep golden brown, turning carefully with a spatula. If slices are sticking to the pan, add a few drops of oil or some margarine around the slices before turning. Transfer cooked slices to a plate and cover. Continue for remaining slices.
  5. Serve with fresh fruit, margarine, powdered sugar, syrup, and/or jam.

Variations:

Orange: Add 2 tsp orange zest to batter. Vanilla: Add 1/4 tsp ground vanilla or 1 tsp vanilla sugar to batter. Chocolate: Use chocolate soy milk or add 1 Tbs cocoa powder to batter. Adjust soy milk accordingly.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover
Vegan French Toast

French Toast

2 bis 3 Portionen / Dauer 30 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

  • 6–8 Scheiben Brot (am besten etwas älter)
  • 2 EL Kichererbsen- oder Weizenmehl (Type 550)
  • 2 EL Speisestärke oder 2 EL Leinsamen gemahlen
  • 1 EL Zucker
  • 1/2 TL Backpulver
  • 1/2 TL Zimt
  • 1/8 TL Muskat
  • 1/8 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL Meersalz
  • 1/4 TL Kala Namak wenn gewünscht
  • 1 Tasse (240 ml) Sojamilch
  • 1 EL Pflanzenöl bei Bedarf mehr

Toppings:

  • frisches Obst (z. B. Bananen-, Ananas- oder Mangoscheiben oder Beeren)
  • Margarine
  • Puderzucker, Sirup oder Marmelade
  1. In einer Rührschüssel Kichererbsenmehl oder Mehl, Stärke oder Leinsamen, Zucker, Backpulver, Zimt, Muskat, Kurkuma, Salz und Kala Namak (falls verwendet) vermischen.
  2. Sojamilch und Öl unterrühren, bis ein glatter Teig entsteht. Nicht zu stark verrühren. 10 Min. ruhen lassen.
  3. Eine große beschichtete Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Wenn ein Tropfen Wasser zischend auf der Oberfläche herumhüpft, hat die Pfanne die richtige Temperatur. (Beim Verwenden einer unbeschichteten Pfanne vor dem Braten jeder Scheibe ein paar Tropfen Öl hineingeben und mit Küchenpapier verreiben.)
  4. Brotscheibe beidseitig ein paar Sekunden lang in den Teig tauchen. In die heiße Pfanne geben und auch die zweite (und ggf. dritte) Scheibe mit dem Teig überziehen. Die Scheiben auf jeder Seite 3 bis 4 Min. goldbraun braten. Vorsichtig mit einem Pfannenwender umdrehen. Wenn die Scheiben anhaften, vor dem Wenden einige Tropfen Öl oder etwas Margarine außen um den Rand der Scheiben verteilen. Fertige Scheiben auf einen Teller legen und abkühlen lassen. Restliche Scheiben ausbacken.
  5. Mit frischem Obst, Margarine, Puderzucker, Sirup und/oder Marmelade servieren.

Variationen:

Orange: 2 TL geriebene Orangenschale unter den Teig mischen. Vanille: 1/4 TL Vanillepulver oder
1 TL Vanillezucker einrühren. Schokoladig: Schoko-Sojamilch verwenden oder 1 EL Kakaopulver unter den Teig mischen. Die Sojamilchmenge entsprechend anpassen.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Teriyaki Tempeh

This a Japanese-inspired dish I’ve been making for a long time. I’ve cooked it for many dinner parties, and it’s big hit with my family – and a favorite of many of my recipe testers. The recipe for Orange Tempeh Teriyaki first appeared in my original cookbook of travel-inspired recipes, The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures. When I re-did the cookbook for the WORLD 2.0 edition I upgraded the recipe and reshot the photo, too.

You can make this teriyaki dish with tofu cubes or chopped seitan instead of tempeh – and apple juice also works well in place of orange juice – if you want less citrus flavor. I often amp up the spices and add freshly ground coriander and Szechuan pepper. If you like it spicy, you can also add more chopped fresh, red chillies along with the chopped onions, ginger, and garlic.

As for the origins and early inspiration for my Teriyaki Tempeh, it brings back memories of Japanese meals with my family in Hawai’i at traditional Japanese grill restaurants. I’ve been to Japan twice, and while I didn’t eat a lot of tempeh dishes during those visits, I certainly ate a lot of tempeh during my visits to Malaysia and other places in South East Asia!

Teriyaki Tempeh
Japanese stir-fry with vegetables

serves 3 to 4 / time 60 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

tempeh & marinade:

  • 14 oz (400 g) tempeh cut into small cubes
  • 1 cup (80 g) spring onions chopped
  • 1 in (3 cm) ginger finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1 red chili seeded, sliced optional
  • 2/3 cup (180 ml) water
  • 1/3 cup (80 ml) soy sauce (shoyu)
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) fresh orange juice
  • 1 Tbs orange zest
  • 3 Tbs rice vinegar
  • 3 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 3 Tbs sugar
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper ground
  1. Combine chopped tempeh cubes and marinade ingredients in a large pot or frying pan. Mix well. Marinate (unheated) for 15–20 min. Mix and turn pieces and marinate another 15–20 min. 
  2. Bring pot (or pan) to low boil. Partially cover and simmer on low heat about 10 min. Stir and turn pieces.
    Continue to simmer on low, stirring infrequently, until liquid is mostly reduced, another 5–10 min.
  3. Increase heat to medium and fry, stirring regularly, until cubes are browned and scorched, 5–10 min. Turn off heat, cover, and set aside.

stir-fried vegetables:

  • 2 cups (150 g) broccoli chopped in small florets
  • 1 large (120 g) carrot peeled, sliced
  • 1 medium (180 g) red pepper chopped
  • 1 Tbs sesame oil
  • 3/4 cup (180 ml) water more as needed
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce (shoyu)
  • 1 Tbs corn starch
  • 3–4 tsp sesame seeds roasted, for garnish
  1. Heat sesame oil in large pot or wok on medium high heat. 
  2. Add chopped broccoli, carrots, and red pepper. Stir fry until vegetables start to soften, 4–6 min.
  3. Add cooked, marinated tempeh to pot or wok of frying vegetables. Mix well. Fry 2–3 min, stirring regularly.
  4. Whisk water, soy sauce, and corn starch in a bowl or measuring cup. Slowly pour mixture into frying vegetables and tempeh cubes, stirring constantly.
  5. Simmer on medium heat, stirring constantly, until sauce has thickened, 3–5 min. Remove from heat.
  6. Garnish with sesame seeds. Serve with short-grain brown rice or sushi rice.

Variations:

No Tempeh: Substitute chopped seitan or tofu cubes for tempeh.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover

Teriyaki Tempeh
Japanisches Wokgericht mit Gemüse

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 60 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

Tempeh & Marinade:

  • 400 g Tempeh gewürfelt
  • 1 Tasse (80 g) Frühlingszwiebel gehackt
  • 3 cm Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 3 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 1 rote Chilischote gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • 2/3 Tasse (180 ml) Wasser
  • 1/3 Tasse (80 ml) Sojasoße (Shoyu)
  • 1/4 Tasse (60 ml) frischer Orangensaft
  • 1 EL Orangenabrieb
  • 3 EL Reisessig
  • 3 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 3 EL Zucker
  • 1/2 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  1. Tempehwürfel und Marinade-Zutaten in einem großen Topf oder einer Pfanne gut vermischen. 15 bis 20 Min. marinieren (nicht erhitzen). Tempeh wenden und weitere 15 bis 20 Min. marinieren. 
  2. Auf niedriger Flamme zum Köcheln bringen, halb abdecken und circa 10 Min. auf niedriger Flamme köcheln. Tempehwürfel wenden, umrühren und weitere 5 bis 10 Min. köcheln, bis die Flüssigkeit größtenteils eingekocht ist.
  3. Hitze erhöhen und Tempeh 5 bis 10 Min. schmoren, bis die Würfel gut gebräunt sind. Flamme abstellen, abdecken und beiseite stellen.

Gemüse:

  • 2 Tassen (150 g) Brokkoli in kleine Röschen geschnitten
  • 1 große (120 g) Möhre geschält, gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (180 g) rote Paprika gehackt
  • 1 EL Sesamöl
  • 3/4 Tasse (180 ml) Wasser bei Bedarf mehr
  • 1 EL Sojasoße (Shoyu)
  • 1 EL Speisestärke
  • 3–4 TL Sesamsamen geröstet, zum Garnieren
  1. Sesamöl in einem Wok oder großem Topf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen.
  2. Brokkoli, Möhre und Paprika hineingeben und 4 bis 6 Min. anbraten, bis das Gemüse weich wird.
  3. Marinierten Tempeh zugeben und gut umrühren. 2 bis 3 Min. unter Rühren braten.
  4. Wasser, Sojasoße und Stärke in einer Schüssel verrühren. Langsam unter Rühren in den Wok zum Gemüse und Tempeh geben.
  5. 3 bis 5 Min. auf mittlerer Flamme köcheln, bis die Soße eindickt. Vom Herd nehmen.
  6. Mit Sesamsamen garnieren und mit Naturrundkorn- oder Sushi-Reis servieren

Variationen:

Ohne Tempeh: Statt Tempeh gehackten Seitan oder Tofuwürfel verwenden.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Plasas & Fufu

Seven Seater
Dakar, Senegal. 10/2009

Got up at the call to worship. The muezzin’s electric voice singing through the alleys and into the open windows of my little room at Saint-Louis Sun Hotel. Cold shower and out the door. Abdou drove me to Gare Routiere Pompiers, an absolute circus of a station an hour’s urban safari from where we began.

It was a challenge, swimming in a sea of shouting drivers and riders intent on filling rundown Renaults and Peugeots for overland journeys to every corner of Senegal within a day’s drive. Eventually I found the vehicles bound for Banjul, The Gambia. Drank a sweet coffee at a makeshift stall while the driver tied a dozen bulky pieces of luggage to the roof with ropes. The engine doesn’t want to start, but then it does. 

Thirty minutes on, our car grinds to a halt and dies. Now we’re on the side of the road in the already hot, still hectic outskirts of Dakar.

The driver says another Sept-Place will rescue us in an hour. Maybe two. Inshallah. So we’re all squatting in the shade in silence. Calm and unfazed. No one is anxious or angry. There is no rush. This happens all the time.

Ninety minutes later another battered Renault seven-seater taxi pulls up; Red dust swirls around us. Brief chatter. In no particular hurry we stand up, leisurely load up our new ride, climb into our busted seats and continue the six hour bumpy journey to the border. 

Plasas & Fufu
Gambian spinach peanut stew with mashed cassava

serves 2 to 3 / time 35 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

plasas (spinach peanut stew):

  • 8–10 cups (12 oz / 350 g) spinach chopped
  • 1 large (230 g) sweet potato peeled, chopped
  • 2 medium (160 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 1 medium (100 g) red onion chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper ground
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 3 Tbs peanut butter or peanuts lightly roasted, ground
  • 1–2 Tbs tomato paste
  • 2 tsp vegetable broth powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup (180 ml) water
  • 1/4 cup (30 g) peanuts lightly roasted, for garnish
  1. Heat 2 Tbs oil in large pot on medium heat.
  2. Add chopped onion, garlic, and ground black pepper. Fry, stirring regularly, until aromatic. 2–3 min.
  3. Add chopped sweet potato and tomatoes. Cook until tomatoes fall apart, 4–6 min, stirring regularly.
  4. In a bowl or measuring cup, whisk peanut butter (or ground peanuts), tomato paste, vegetable broth powder, salt, and water. Stir into pot. Bring to low boil, reduce heat to medium low. Simmer partially covered, stirring occasionally, 10 min.
  5. Stir in chopped spinach. Cover and steam 5–7 min, stirring occasionally, adding more water if needed. When the spinach is done, stir a few times and turn off heat.
  6. Garnish with roasted peanuts. Serve with fufu or rice.

fufu (mashed cassava):

  • 18 oz (500 g) cassava (also known as: manioc & yuca)peeled, chopped
  • 1 Tbs margarine or vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cup (360 ml) water more as needed
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  1. Bring 1 1/2 cup (360 ml) water to boil in large pot. Add chopped cassava.
  2. Return to boil, reduce heat to low. Cover, steam until soft, stirring occasionally, about 20 min.
  3. Remove from heat. Add margarine (or oil) and salt. Mix well. Let cool 5–10 min.
  4. Blend or mash until mostly smooth with an immersion blender or potato masher until mostly smooth. Add water gradually, if needed. The consistency should be similar to thick, sticky mashed potatoes.
The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover

Siebensitzer
Dakar, Senegal. 10/2009

Stehe mit dem Ruf zum Morgengebet auf. Die elektrisierende Stimme des Muezzins klingt durch die Straßen und findet ihren Weg durchs offene Fenster in mein kleines Zimmer im Saint-Louis Sun Hotel. Kalte Dusche und los. Abdou fährt mich zum Gare Routiere Pompiers, einem absolut chaotischen Bus- und Autosammelplatz, ungefähr eine Stunde Irrfahrt vom Hotel entfernt.

Nicht gerade einfach, sich durch das Meer an Menschen zu drängen und genau den richtigen laut rufenden Fahrer zu finden, der seinen rostlaubigen Renault oder Peugeot für eine bis zu einen Tag dauernde Überlandfahrt in einen bestimmten Winkel Senegals mit Passagieren vollpacken will. Irgendwann finde ich die Ecke, wo die Mitfahrgelegenheiten nach Banjul, Gambia, stehen. Schnell noch einen süßen Kaffee von einem klitzekleinen Stand runterkippen, während der Fahrer mindestens ein Dutzend unhandliche Gepäckstücke auf dem Dach festzurrt. Der Motor will erst nicht anspringen, erwacht dann aber doch zum Leben. 

Dreißig Minuten später kommt unser umgebautes Vehikel zum Halten und streikt. Nun sitzen wir alle am Straßenrand, kurz hinter Dakar, wo es schon jetzt ziemlich heiß und ziemlich hektisch ist.

Laut Fahrer wird uns bald ein anderer Sept-Place aufsammeln. In einer Stunde. Vielleicht zwei. Inschallah. Also hocken wir uns in den Schatten. Alle um mich herum sind ruhig und gelassen, niemand irgendwie nervös oder wütend, niemand gehetzt. So etwas passiert ständig.

Neunzig Minuten später rollt ein anderer zerbeulter Siebensitzer-Renault an und wirbelt den roten Staub um uns auf. Ein kurzer Austausch, dann stehen alle auf, niemand in besonderer Eile. Gelassen wird unsere neue Mitfahrgelegenheit mit dem Gepäck beladen und alle klettern auf ihre durchgesessenen Sitze.

Weiter geht die noch sechsstündige Ruckelfahrt in Richtung Grenze.

Plasas & Fufu
Gambischer Spinat-Erdnuss-Eintopf mit Maniok-Stampf

2 bis 3 Portionen / Dauer 35 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

Plasas (Spinat-Erdnuss-Eintopf):

  • 8–10 Tassen (350 g) Spinat gehackt
  • 1 große (230 g) Süßkartoffel geschält, gehackt
  • 2 mittelgroße (160 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (100 g) rote Zwiebel gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 1/2 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 3 EL Erdnussbutter oder Erdnüsse leicht geröstet, gemahlen
  • 1–2 EL Tomatenmark
  • 2 TL Gemüsebrühpulver
  • 1/2 TL Salz
  • 3/4 Tasse (180 ml) Wasser
  • 1/4 Tasse (30 g) Erdnüsse leicht geröstet, zum Garnieren
  1. 2 EL Öl in einem großen Topf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen.
  2. Zwiebel, Knoblauch und schwarzen Pfeffer hineingeben. 2 bis 3 Min. unter regelmäßigem Rühren anschwitzen, bis es aromatisch duftet.
  3. Süßkartoffel und Tomaten zugeben. 4 bis 6 Min. unter regelmäßigem Rühren braten, bis die Tomaten zerfallen.
  4. Erdnussbutter oder gemahlene Erdnüsse, Tomatenmark, Gemüsebrühpulver, Salz und 3/4 Tasse (180 ml) Wasser in einer Schüssel verquirlen. In den Topf geben, umrühren und zum Kochen bringen. Flamme herunterstellen und den Eintopf 10 Min. unter gelegentlichem Rühren köcheln lassen.
  5. Spinat einrühren, abdecken und 5 bis 7 Min. unter gelegentlichem Rühren dämpfen. Bei Bedarf etwas mehr Wasser einrühren. Wenn der Spinat gar ist, mehrmals umrühren und vom Herd nehmen.
  6. Mit gerösteten Erdnüssen garnieren und mit Fufu oder Reis servieren.

Fufu (Maniok-Stampf):

  • 500 g Maniok (bzw. Cassava oder Yuca) geschält, gehackt
  • 1 EL Margarine oder Pflanzenöl
  • 1 1/2 Tasse (360 ml) Wasser bei Bedarf mehr
  • 1/4 TL Salz
  1. 1 1/2 Tassen (360 ml) Wasser in einem großen Topf zum Kochen bringen. Maniok hineingeben.
  2. Erneut zum Kochen bringen, dann Flamme niedrig stellen. Abgedeckt circa 20 Min. unter gelegentlichem Rühren weich kochen.
  3. Vom Herd nehmen. Margarine oder Öl und Salz hinzufügen. Gut umrühren und 5 bis 10 Min. abkühlen lassen.
  4. Maniokstücke mit einem Pürierstab oder Kartoffelstampfer zu einem größtenteils glatten Stampf verarbeiten. Bei Bedarf nach und nach etwas Wasser zugeben. Die Konsistenz sollte einem dicken, klebrigen Kartoffelbrei ähneln.
The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Vegan Paneer Makhani

This is my updated recipe for vegan Paneer Makhani, a north Indian classic and family favorite. This dish will always remind me of my first to trip to India in 2001, and all the back alley eateries in Delhi’s Pahar Ganj, the backpacker neighborhood– which still exists, and I’ve been back to literally dozens of times in the last two decades. On my last visit to Delhi and Pahar Ganj I think I did find one of the hole-in-the-wall restaurants from way back then, but you can never be sure. Through the dusty maze of winding alleys, it’s so easy to get lost… or unsure if a place is the same or different than one you saw an hour ago… or years ago!

For the original edition of The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures, my brother Adam asked me if I could make a vegan version of this one dish his family used to love at a local Indian restaurant in the New Jersey suburbs. I got to work and came up with a very decent interpretation of the classic dish, which is very heavy on cream and butter (hence the name, which basically translates to ‘Cheese Butter’ or ‘Cheesy Cream’!) But as with Indian naming conventions, this dish may be found with the names ‘Shahi Paneer‘ (which is what I remember from the Delhi Pahar Ganj menus), or in many parts of India,especially if cooked at home – Paneer Butter Masala, or just PBM. (This is what it was called in most places in Amravati, Maharashtra where I lived for a year – it often appears on menus in abbreviated form.) I’ve come to understand that Paneer Makhani is most commonly used outside of India, especially in restaurants.

Whatever you want to call it, this dish is hands-down a pleaser and a delicious curry to serve friends and families, it’s a hit with children of all ages, too. When making it for adults I’ll often dial up the spices and heat – you can just double the amount of ground cumin, coriander, Garam Masala spice mix (see my INDIA cookbook for my own homemade recipe), and red chili powder. I also love to add fresh (or dried) curry leaves, a bit of ground fenugreek (or methi – fenugreek leaves – at the end) and a black cardamom pod… for that delicious smokey flavor.

Instead of using dairy (cream and butter) I use blended cashews, which is very common in India, too, and used as a base in many creamy curries. And of course, I’m using my infamous tofu-paneer recipe, implementing lightly batter-fried tofu cubes instead of traditional paneer, or homemade cheese cubes.

Yeah, it’s me. India 2001.

Paneer Makhani
North Indian creamy tomato sauce with tofu paneer

serves 2 to 3 / time 45 min +

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

tofu paneer:

  • 7 oz (200 g) tofu
  • 2 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce
  • 2 Tbs nutritional yeast flakes or chickpea flour (besan)
  • 2 Tbs corn starch
  • 2–3 Tbs coconut oil or vegetable oil
  1. Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in a dish towel. Weight with a cutting board for 15–20 min to remove excess moisture. Unwrap and cut into triangles or cubes
  2. Combine lemon juice, soy sauce, nutritional yeast flakes (or chickpea flour), and corn starch in bowl. Add tofu cubes, mix well, coat all pieces.
  3. Heat oil in a small frying pan on medium high. Fry battered cubes evenly in batches until golden brown, turning regularly, 4–6 min. Remove, drain, set aside.

tomato cream curry:

  • 2/3 cup (80 g) cashews 
  • 2 medium (180 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 2 1/2 cups (600 ml) water
  • 1 in (3 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic finely chopped optional
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 4–6 curry leaves or 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1 tsp cumin ground
  • 1 tsp Garam Masala
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing) optional
  • 2 Tbs tomato paste
  • 1 tsp red chili powder or paprika ground
  • 3/4 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1 Tbs lemon juice
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 1 1/4 tsp salt
  • fresh coriander leaves chopped, for garnish
  1. Soak cashews in a bowl of boiling hot water for 30 min. Drain and discard water.
  2. Blend chopped tomatoes with 1 1/4 cups (300 ml) water in a blender or food processor until smooth.
  3. Heat oil in a large pot on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to pop (20–30 sec), add chopped garlic (if using), ginger, curry leaves or bay leaves, ground coriander, cumin, Garam Masala, and asafoetida (if using). Fry, stirring often, until richly aromatic, 2–3 min.
  4. Stir in blended tomatoes. Bring to simmer and reduce to medium low heat. Cook, stirring often, until sauce is reduced and turns dark red, 10–15 min.
  5. Blend soaked cashews with 1 1/4 cups (300 ml) water until smooth. Stir into simmering tomato sauce.
  6. Stir in tomato paste, red chili powder (or paprika), turmeric, lemon juice, sugar, and salt. Return to simmer. Cook, stirring often, until sauce thickens and oil begins to separate, 5–8 min.
  7. Stir in fried tofu cubes. Continue to simmer on low, stirring occasionally, 4–5 min. Remove from heat.
  8. Garnish with chopped fresh coriander. Serve with basmati rice, chapati (roti), or naan.
The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover

Paneer Makhani
Nordindisches cremiges Tomatencurry mit Tofu-Paneer

2 bis 3 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min. +

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

Tofu-Paneer:

  • 200 g Tofu
  • 2 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Sojasoße
  • 2 EL Hefeflocken oder Kichererbsenmehl (Besan)
  • 2 EL Speisestärke
  • 2–3 EL Kokos- oder Pflanzenöl
  1. Tofu in dicke Scheiben schneiden, in ein sauberes Geschirrtuch wickeln und 15 bis 20 Min. mit einem Schneidebrett beschweren, um überschüssige Flüssigkeit herauszupressen. Auswickeln und in Dreiecke
    oder Würfel schneiden.
  2. Zitronensaft, Sojasoße, Hefeflocken oder Kichererbsenmehl und Stärke in einer Rührschüssel verrühren. Tofuwürfel hinzufügen und mit der Mischung überziehen.
  3. Öl in einer kleinen Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Mit Teig überzogene Würfel in mehreren Durchgängen 4 bis 6 Min. gleichmäßig goldbraun braten, dabei regelmäßig wenden. Aus der Pfanne nehmen, abtropfen lassen und beiseite stellen.

Cremiges Tomatencurry:

  • 2/3 Tasse (80 g) Cashewkerne
  • 2 mittelgroße (180 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 2 1/2 Tassen (600 ml) Wasser
  • 3 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • frisches Koriandergrün gehackt, zum Garnieren
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 4–6 Curry- oder 2 Lorbeerblätter
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1 TL Garam Masala
  • 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant) wenn gewünscht
  • 2 EL Tomatenmark
  • 1 TL Chili- oder Paprikapulver
  • 3/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft
  • 2 TL Zucker
  • 1 1/4 TL Salz
  1. Cashewkerne 30 Min. in einer Schüssel mit heißem Wasser einweichen. Abgießen und Einweichwasser wegschütten.
  2. Tomaten mit 1 1/4 Tasse (300 ml) Wasser in einem Mixer oder einer Küchenmaschine glatt pürieren.
  3. Öl in einem großen Topf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) Knoblauch (falls verwendet), Ingwer, Curry– oder Lorbeerblätter, Koriander, Kreuzkümmel, Garam Masala und Asafoetida (falls verwendet) zugeben. 2 bis 3 Min. unter Rühren anschwitzen, bis es aromatisch duftet.
  4. Pürierte Tomaten einrühren und zum Köcheln bringen. Flamme herunterstellen und das Curry 10 bis 15 Min. unter häufigem Rühren köcheln lassen, bis die Soße reduziert und dunkelrot ist.
  5. Eingeweichte Cashewkerne mit 1 1/4 Tasse (300 ml) Wasser glatt pürieren und in das köchelnde Curry rühren.
  6. Tomatenmark, Chili– oder Paprikapulver, Kurkuma, Zitronensaft, Zucker und Salz einrühren. Erneut zum Köcheln bringen und unter häufigem Rühren 5 bis 8 Min. köcheln, bis die Soße eindickt und das Öl sich trennt.
  7. Tofustücke unterheben. 4 bis 5 weitere Min. auf niedriger Flamme unter gelegentlichem Rühren köcheln. Vom Herd nehmen.
  8. Mit gehacktem Koriandergrün garnieren und mit Basmati-Reis, Chapati (Roti) oder Naan servieren.
The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Poha

Poha
Indian flattened rice with potatoes & peas

serves 2 to 3 / time 20 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

  • 1 1/2 cups (110 g) poha (flattened rice flakes)
  • 1 1/2 cups (350 ml) water
  • 3 medium (250 g) potatoes peeled, chopped
  • 2 small (100 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 1/2 cup (50 g) peas (fresh or frozen)
  • 1 small (70 g) onion chopped
  • 1/2 in (1 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 1 green chili seeded, sliced optional
  • 3 Tbs peanuts or cashews lightly roasted
  • handful fresh coriander chopped, for garnish
  • 2–3 lime slices
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 6–8 curry leaves optional
  • 1 tsp cumin ground
  • 3/4 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1 Tbs lime juice
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 3/4 tsp sea salt
  1. Cover poha rice flakes with water in a bowl. Soak 2 min and drain excess water. Set aside for now.
  2. Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok on medium high heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to pop (20–30 sec), add chopped onion, ginger, green chili, and curry leaves (if using), and ground cumin. Fry, stirring often, until richly aromatic and onions are browned, about 2–3 min.
  3. Add chopped potatoes. Continue to cook, stirring often, until potatoes begin to soften, 5–7 min.
  4. Stir in peanuts (or cashews). Continue to cook on medium heat until potatoes are soft, another 3–5 min.
  5. Add soaked poha, peas, and chopped tomatoes, followed by ground turmeric, lime juice, sugar, and salt. Mix well, but gently so rice flakes don’t get mushy. Cook 2–3 min, stirring regularly. If needed, add 2–3 Tbs water and cover briefly to steam. Remove from heat. Cover and let sit 5 minutes.
  6. Garnish withchopped fresh coriander. Serve with lime slices.

Variations:

Vedic: Replace onion with 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing) and 1/4 tsp Garam Masala. Fruity: Add 2 Tbs golden raisins or chopped dates along with tomatoes. Coconut: Add 1–2 Tbs fresh grated coconut along with soaked poha in the last few minutes of cooking.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover

Poha
Indische Reisflocken mit Kartoffeln & Erbsen

2 bis 3 Portionen / Dauer 20 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

  • 1 1/2 Tassen (110 g) Poha (flache Reisflocken)
  • 1 1/2 Tassen (350 ml) Wasser
  • 3 mittelgroße (250 g) Kartoffeln geschält, gehackt
  • 2 kleine (100 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 1/2 Tasse (50 g) Erbsen (frisch oder gefroren)
  • 1 kleine (70 g) Zwiebel gehackt
  • 1 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 grüne Chilischote gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • 3 EL Erdnüsse oder Cashewkerne leicht geröstet
  • 1 Handvoll frisches Koriandergrün gehackt
  • 2–3 Limettenspalten
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 6–8 Curryblätter wenn gewünscht
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 3/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1 EL Limettensaft
  • 1 TL Zucker
  • 3/4 TL Salz
  1. Poha-Flocken 2 Min. einer Schüssel mit Wasser einweichen. Abgießen, Einweichwasser wegschütten und beiseite stellen.
  2. Öl in einer großen Pfanne oder einem Wok auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) Zwiebel, Ingwer, Chilischote und Curryblätter (falls verwendet) sowie Kreuzkümmel hineingeben.
  3. 2 bis 3 Min. unter häufigem Rühren anschwitzen, bis es aromatisch duftet und die Zwiebel gebräunt ist.
  4. Kartoffeln hinzufügen. 5 bis 7 Min. unter häufigem Rühren braten, bis die Kartoffeln weich werden.
  5. Erdnüsse oder Cashewkerne einrühren. Weitere 3 bis 5 Min. auf mittlerer Flamme braten, bis die Kartoffeln richtig durch sind.
  6. Eingeweichte Poha-Flocken, Erbsen und Tomaten hinzufügen. Gleich danach Kurkuma, Limettensaft, Zucker und Salz einrühren. Beim Umrühren darauf achten, dass die Reisflocken nicht breiig werden. 2 bis 3 weitere Min. unter Rühren braten. Bei Bedarf 2 bis 3 EL Wasser einrühren und Poha kurz abgedeckt etwas dämpfen. Vom Herd nehmen, abdecken und 5 Min. durchziehen lassen.
  7. Mit frischem gehacktem Koriandergrün garnieren und mit Limettenspalten servieren.

Variationen:

Vedisch: Zwiebel mit 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant) und 1/4 TL Garam Masala ersetzen. Fruchtig: 2 EL Sultaninen oder gehackte Datteln zusammen mit den Tomaten zugeben. Kokos: In den letzten Kochminuten 1 bis 2 EL frische Kokosraspel unterrühren.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Gobi Tikka

This is a quick and easy vegan recipe for oven-roasted Gobi Tikka, a North Indian dish I love to make and serve with a bunch of other Indian recipes, especially if hosting a North Indian dinner party. It’s a fast marinade (no waiting needed) and goes right in the oven and is done in about 30 to 40 minutes!

Especially in India, some traditional marinades for Gobi Tikka use yogurt, but I’ve seen it made many, many times with a basic (but delicious) dairy-free marinade much like mine. If you want, you can add 2–3 Tbs soy or coconut yogurt to the marinade, which will result in softer (less crunchy outside) roasted cauliflower. I often make it with some coconut milk, too, which gives it a more South Indian twist. See the Variations for that! Also, if you like more bold flavors, feel free to double all the spices, or add 1 tsp of (fresh!) garam masala spice mix. (I’ve got a recipe for garam masala in my INDIA cookbook/e-book.) You can also increase (or decrease) the amount of oil for the marinade, if you like.

I don’t use (wheat or chickpea/besan) flour for my Gobi Tikka, but if you want, you could add 1–2 Tbs of either to your marinade. Possibly you’ll need to adjust the cooking time and liquid amounts — increasing slightly either the water or lemon juice, and maybe tweaking the salt a bit, too. In my opinion, with the flour-y batter-fried coating it starts becoming more like Gobi Pakoras or Gobi Manchurian, both of which I make differently. I like my Gobi Tikka to focus more on the vegetable, not the coating.

Traditionally this dish would often be made in a tandoor clay oven, but probably, like me you haven’t got one of those; a halfway decent ‘modern’ gas or electric oven will work to crank out an awesome Gobi Tikka in no time. It’ll go even faster if you’ve got that convection (Umluft) magic going on… my ovens at home and at the cooking studio don’t, but I’ve always been pleased with the results. I’ve had a few friends and recipe testers do this recipe in an air-fryer and that’s fun, too… of course, you’ll need to reduce the roasting time and keep a good eye on things while it’s cooking, unless you like Burnt Gobi!

Serve it up with some hot, fresh flatbreads, like chapati or naan, or make a big pot of basmati rice. Again, this dish is great with a bunch of others to make a North Indian thali, or combo/set meal. It’s not really saucy, so I often like to make Matar Tofu-Paneer (green peas and fried tofu cubes) or Palak Tofu-Paneer (spinach and fried tofu cubes) to go with it, especially if serving it with rice.

Gobi Tikka
North Indian roasted cauliflower

serves 3 to 4 / time 45 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

  • 4 cups (400 g) cauliflower chopped
  • 1 medium (90 g) tomato chopped
  • 1 1/2 in (4 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 2 tsp tamarind paste (seedless)
  • 1 Tbs lemon juice
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) water
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil more as needed
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1/2 tsp cumin ground
  • 1/2 tsp coriander ground
  • 1/2 tsp paprika ground
  • 1 tsp amchoor (mango) powder
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper ground
  • 1 tsp salt
  • small handful fresh coriander chopped, for garnish
  1. Preheat oven to 425°F / 220°C / level 7.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk tamarind paste, lemon juice, sugar, water, and oil.
  3. Add chopped cauliflower, tomato, ginger, and garlic. Toss to mix several times.
  4. Add ground turmeric, cumin, coriander, paprika, amchoor powder (if using), black pepper, and salt. Mix well to coat all pieces with spices.
  5. Generously grease a medium large (8 x 10 in / 20 x 26 cm) baking tray or casserole dish with oil.
  6. Pour mixture into the dish and transfer to the oven. Bake 20 min. Turn and mix pieces. Return to oven and bake until cauliflower pieces are roasted, scorched, and crispy on the edges, another 10–20 Min. Remove from oven.
  7. Garnish with chopped fresh coriander.
  8. Serve as an appetizer or with basmati rice, chapati (roti), or naan.

Variations:

Coconut creamy: Add 1/4 cup (60 ml) coconut milk along with tamarind and lemon juice. Vedic: Substitute 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing) for chopped garlic. Fruity: Add 3/4 cup (100 g) chopped fresh pineapple and 3–4 chopped soft dates or 2–3 Tbs golden raisins.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover
Gobi Tikka

Gobi Tikka
Nordindischer gerösteter Blumenkohl

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

  • 4 Tassen (400 g) Blumenkohl gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (90 g) Tomate gehackt
  • 4 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 2 TL Tamarindenpaste (ohne Kerne)
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft
  • 2 TL Zucker
  • 1/4 Tasse (60 ml) Wasser
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl bei Bedarf mehr
  • 1/2 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Paprikapulver
  • 1 TL Amchur (Mangopulver)
  • 1/4 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 1 TL Salz
  • 1 kleine Handvoll frisches Koriandergrün gehackt, zum Garnieren
  1. Ofen auf 220°C / Stufe 7 vorheizen.
  2. Tamarindenpaste, Zitronensaft, Zucker, Wasser und Öl in einer großen Schüssel verrühren.
  3. Blumenkohl, Tomate, Ingwer und Knoblauch hinzufügen. Mehrmals umrühren und das Gemüse mit dem Mix überziehen.
  4. Kurkuma, Kreuzkümmel, Koriander, Paprikapulver, Amchur (falls verwendet), schwarzen Pfeffer und Salz zugeben und alles gut vermischen.
  5. Eine mittelgroße (20 x 26 cm) Auflaufform mit Öl einfetten.
  6. Gemüsemischung hineingeben und 20 Min. im Ofen rösten. Herausnehmen und die Gemüsestücke wenden. Weitere 10–20 Min. im Ofen rösten, bis der Blumenkohl gar und außen knusprig und schön gebräunt ist. Aus dem Ofen nehmen.
  7. Mit frischem gehacktem Koriandergrün garnieren und als Vorspeise oder mit Basmati-Reis, Chapati (Roti) oder Naan servieren.

Variationen:

Cremig mit Kokosnuss: 1/4 Tasse (60 ml) Kokosmilch zusammen mit der Tamarindenpaste und dem Zitronensaft einrühren. Vedisch: Statt Knoblauch 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant) verwenden. Fruchtig: 3/4 Tasse (100 g) frische gehackte Ananas und 3 bis 4 gehackte weiche Datteln oder 2 bis 3 EL Sultaninen hinzufügen.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Mombasa Red Curry

Mombasa Red Curry

Mombasa Red Curry
with tofu, sweet potato, pineapple & peanuts

serves 4 / time 45 min

Recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

  • 7 oz (200 g) firm tofu
  • 1 medium large (220 g) sweet potato peeled, chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups (100 g) green beans chopped
  • 1 cup (125 g) pineapple chopped
  • 1 medium (100 g) tomato chopped
  • 2 Tbs dried apricots chopped
  • 2 shallots or 1 medium (100 g) red onion chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1 in (3 cm) ginger finely chopped
  • 1 stalk lemongrass finely choppedoptional
  • 1 red chili seeded, slicedoptional
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 2 tsp coriander ground
  • 1 tsp cumin ground
  • 1 tsp paprika ground
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1/2 cinnamon stick or 1/4 tsp cinnamon ground
  • 1 black cardamom pod or 2 green cardamom pods
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 2/3 cups (400 ml) coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) water more as needed
  • 1 Tbs lime juice
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup (45 g) peanuts lightly roasted
  • small handful fresh basil or parsley chopped, for garnish
  1. Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in a kitchen towel. Weight with a heavy cutting board and press out extra moisture, 15–20 min. Unwrap and cut in medium cubes. 
  2. Heat oil in a large pot on medium high heat. Add chopped shallots (or onion). Fry, stirring regularly, until lightly browned, 2–3 min. Add tofu cubes and chopped sweet potato. Continue to fry another 5–6 min.
  3. Stir in chopped garlic, ginger, lemongrass and red chili (if using). Add ground coriander, cumin, paprika, turmeric, cinnamon, cardamom, and bay leaves. Fry, stirring constantly until richly aromatic, 2–3 min.
  4. Add chopped green beans, pineapple, tomato, and apricots. Cook partially covered, stirring regularly, until tomatoes fall apart, 4–6 min.
  5. Gradually stir in coconut milk. Bring to simmer, reduce heat to medium low. Cook until vegetables are mostly soft, about 7–10 min, stirring in water gradually as needed. Remove and discard whole spices.
  6. Stir in lime juice and salt. Stir in peanuts, or save for garnish. Cover until ready to serve.
  7. Garnish with chopped, fresh basil or parsley. Serve with rice.

Variations:

Soy chunks: Soak 1 cup (80 g) large soy chunks in hot water for 20 min. Drain and press out extra water.
Fry soaked chunks in place of, or with tofu. Adjust lime juice and salt if needed. Vegetables: Substitute or
add chopped broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, eggplant (aubergine), bamboo shoots, etc. after adding spices.

Mombasa Red Curry

Mombasa Red Curry
mit Tofu, Süßkartoffel, Ananas & Erdnüssen

4 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

  • 200 g fester Tofu
  • 1 mittelgroße (220 g) Süßkartoffel geschält, gewürfelt
  • 1 1/2 Tassen (100 g) grüne Bohnen gehackt
  • 1 Tasse (125 g) Ananas gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (100 g) Tomate gehackt
  • 2 EL getrocknete Aprikosen gehackt
  • 2 mittelgroße Schalotten (100 g) gehackt
  • 3 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 3 cm Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 Stange Zitronengras fein gehacktwenn gewünscht
  • 1 rote Chilischote gehacktwenn gewünscht
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 2 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1 TL Paprikapulver
  • 1/2 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/2 Zimtstange oder 1/4 TL Zimt gemahlen
  • 1 schwarze oder 2 grüne Kardamomkapseln
  • 2 Lorbeerblätter
  • 1 2/3 Tasse (400 ml) Kokosmilch
  • 1/2 Tasse (120 ml) Wasser bei Bedarf mehr
  • 1 EL Limettensaft
  • 1 TL Salz
  • 1/3 Tasse (45 g) Erdnüsse leicht geröstet
  • frisches Basilikum oder Petersilie gehackt
  1. Tofu in dicke Scheiben schneiden, in ein sauberes Geschirrtuch wickeln und 15 bis 20 Min. mit einem dicken Schneidebrett beschweren, um überschüssige Flüssigkeit herauszupressen. Tofu auswickeln und würfeln.
  2. Öl in einem großen Topf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Schalotten hineingeben und 2 bis 3 Min. unter Rühren leicht bräunen. Tofuwürfel und Süßkartoffel hinzufügen und weitere 5 bis 6 Min. braten.
  3. Knoblauch, Ingwer, Zitronengras und Chilischote (falls verwendet) zugeben. Koriander, Kreuzkümmel, Paprikapulver, Kurkuma, Zimt, Kardamom und Lorbeerblätter einrühren. 2 bis 3 weitere Min. unter Rühren braten, bis es aromatisch duftet.
  4. Grüne Bohnen, Ananas, Tomate und Aprikosen einrühren. 4 bis 6 Min. halb abgedeckt unter regelmäßigem Rühren schmoren, bis die Tomaten zerfallen.
  5. Nach und nach Kokosmilch einrühren und zum Köcheln bringen. Flamme niedrig stellen und 7 bis 10 Min. köcheln, bis das Gemüse größtenteils weich ist. Bei Bedarf nach und nach Wasser einrühren.
    Ganze Gewürze entfernen und wegwerfen.
  6. Limettensaft und Salz einrühren. Erdnüsse unterrühren oder fürs Garnieren aufheben.
    Bis zum Servieren abgedeckt ziehen lassen.
  7. Mit frischem gehacktem Basilikum oder Petersilie garnieren und mit Reis servieren.

Variationen:

Sojaschnetzel: 1 Tasse (80 g) große Sojaschnetzel 20 Min. in heißem Wasser einweichen. Abgießen und Wasser herauspressen. Anstelle oder zusammen mit dem Tofu braten. Zitronensaft- und Salzmenge bei Bedarf anpassen. Gemüse: Gemüse aus dem Rezept nach dem Zugeben der Gewürze mit gehacktem Brokkoli, Blumenkohl, Kartoffeln, Aubergine, Bambussprossen o. a. ergänzen oder ersetzen.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Matar Tofu Paneer

Matar Tofu Paneer is another one of those sure-to-please Indian dishes which I love to cook at home and for dinner parties. It works great with other North Indian dishes and luscious, steamed basmati rice – or, even more Northern: a stack of hot chapati flatbreads.

This recipe features my own tofu-paneer which I’ve perfected over the years. This dish is quite similar to Palak Paneer, but features green peas instead of spinach. Also, here the sauce isn’t quite as creamy (but can be if you follow the Variation with cashews and tomato paste.) I like to make this dish rather thick and chunky if I’m serving it with bread, and make it thinner with more gravy if I’m serving it with rice.

If you’re wondering, I got those gorgeous copper ‘balti’ buckets a few years ago in India! I love to recreate the restaurant experience at home, and having many original sets of metalware for Indian food is such a pleaser.

Notes on the Matar (peas) curry: Be sure to get some asafoetida (hing) — it’s essential for real, authentic Indian flavors. If you can get fresh curry leaves, this dish is really over the top, but with dried curry leaves it’s still awesome. And as always, be sure to grind your own cumin and coriander, and ideally use a super-fresh homemade Garam Masala spice mix! (My own personal Garam Masala recipe is in my INDIA cookbook / e-book!)

Matar Tofu Paneer

North Indian peas with tofu paneer

serves 2 / time 45 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

tofu paneer:

  • 7 oz (200 g) tofu
  • 2 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce
  • 2 Tbs nutritional yeast flakes or chickpea flour (besan)
  • 2 Tbs corn starch
  • 2–3 Tbs coconut oil or vegetable oil
  1. Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in a dish towel. Weight with a cutting board for 15–20 min to remove excess moisture. Unwrap and cut into triangles or cubes
  2. Combine lemon juice, soy sauce, nutritional yeast flakes (or chickpea flour), and corn starch in bowl. 
    Add tofu cubes, mix well, coat all pieces.
  3. Heat oil in a small frying pan on medium high. Fry battered cubes evenly in batches until golden brown, turning regularly, 4–6 min. Remove, drain, set aside.

matar (peas) curry:

  • 2 cups (8 oz / 220 g) peas
  • 2 medium (180 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 1 small (70 g) red onion chopped optional
  • 1 clove garlic finely chopped optional
  • 3/4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 1 small green chili seeded, sliced optional
  • fresh coriander leaves chopped, for garnish
  • 3/4 cup (180 ml) water more as needed
  • 1 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1–2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 4–6 curry leaves
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1/2 tsp cumin ground
  • 1/2 tsp Garam Masala
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing) optional
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  1. Blend chopped tomatoes with 3/4 cup (180 ml) water in a blender or food processor until smooth.
  2. Heat oil in a large pot on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to pop (20–30 sec), add chopped onion and garlic (if using), ginger, green chili (if using), curry leaves, ground coriander, cumin, Garam Masala, turmeric, and asafoetida. Fry, stirring often, until richly aromatic, 2–3 min.
  3. Stir in blended tomatoes. Bring to simmer and reduce to medium low heat. Cook, stirring often, until sauce is reduced and turns dark red, 10–15 min.
  4. Stir in peas. Continue to simmer, stirring often, adding water if needed, until peas are tender, 3–5 min.
  5. Stir in fried tofu cubes, lemon juice, sugar, and salt. Simmer on low, stirring occasionally, 4–5 min.
  6. Garnish with chopped fresh coriander. Serve with basmati rice, chapati (roti), or naan.

Variations:

Aloo Matar: Fry 2–3 chopped medium potatoes until golden brown and soft. Add to simmering curry instead of fried tofu cubes. Rich & Creamy: Blend tomatoes with 2–3 Tbs cashews and 1 Tbs tomato paste. For all variations, adjust water and salt as needed.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover

Matar Tofu Paneer

Nordindische Erbsen mit Tofu-Paneer

2 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

Tofu-Paneer:

  • 200 g Tofu
  • 2 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Sojasoße
  • 2 EL Hefeflocken oder Kichererbsenmehl (Besan)
  • 2 EL Speisestärke
  • 2–3 EL Kokos- oder Pflanzenöl
  • Tofu in dicke Scheiben schneiden, in ein sauberes Geschirrtuch wickeln und 15 bis 20 Min. mit einem Schneidebrett beschweren, um überschüssige Flüssigkeit herauszupressen. Auswickeln und in Dreiecke
    oder Würfel schneiden.
  • Zitronensaft, Sojasoße, Hefeflocken oder Kichererbsenmehl und Stärke in einer Rührschüssel verrühren. Tofuwürfel hinzufügen und mit der Mischung überziehen.
  • Öl in einer kleinen Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Mit Teig überzogene Würfel in mehreren Durchgängen 4 bis 6 Min. gleichmäßig goldbraun braten, dabei regelmäßig wenden. Aus der Pfanne nehmen, abtropfen lassen und beiseite stellen.

Matar- (Erbsen-) Curry:

  • 2 Tassen (220 g) Erbsen
  • 2 mittelgroße (180 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 1 kleine (70 g) rote Zwiebel gehacktwenn gewünscht
  • 1 Knoblauchzehe fein gehacktwenn gewünscht
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 grüne Chilischote gehacktwenn gewünscht
  • frisches Koriandergrün gehackt, zum Garnieren
  • 3/4 Tasse (180 ml) Wasser bei Bedarf mehr
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1–2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 4–6 Curryblätter
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Garam Masala
  • 1/2 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant) wenn gewünscht
  • 1 TL Zucker
  • 3/4 TL Salz
  1. Tomaten mit 3/4 Tasse (180 ml) Wasser in einem Mixer oder einer Küchenmaschine glatt pürieren.
  2. Öl in einem großen Topf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) Zwiebel und Knoblauch (falls verwendet), Ingwer, grüne Chilischote, Curryblätter, Koriander, Kreuzkümmel, Garam Masala, Kurkuma und Asafoetida (falls verwendet) hinzufügen.
    Unter Rühren 2 bis 3 Min. braten, bis es aromatisch duftet.
  3. Pürierte Tomaten einrühren und zum Köcheln bringen. Flamme herunterstellen und 10 bis 15 Min.
    unter häufigem Rühren köcheln, bis die Soße reduziert ist und dunkelrot wird.
  4. Erbsen einrühren und 3 bis 5 weitere Min. unter Rühren köcheln, bis sie weich sind. Bei Bedarf etwas mehr Wasser einrühren.
  5. Tofustücke, Zitronensaft, Zucker und Salz unterrühren. 4 bis 5 weitere Min. unter gelegentlichem Rühren köcheln.
  6. Mit frischem gehacktem Koriandergrün garnieren und mit Basmati-Reis, Chapati (Roti) oder Naan servieren.

Variationen:

Aloo Matar: 2 bis 3 gehackte Kartoffeln goldbraun braten und anstelle der Erbsen ins köchelnde Curry geben. Cremig: Tomaten mit 2 bis 3 EL Cashewkernen und 1 EL Tomatenmark pürieren. Wasser- und Salzmenge bei allen Variationen entsprechend anpassen.

Chilli Tofu Paneer

Chilli Tofu Paneer

Chilli Tofu Paneer (or Chilli Tofu) is another of my absolute favorite Indo-Chinese dishes, and one that I look for all the time in India. Most recently I was eating Chilly Tofu (as it was written on the menu) just about every day during an extended visit to Rishikesh — a few years back on my last tour of North India. There were two fantastic restaurants there that I ate at all the time, and this dish and Vegetable Manchurian were my go-to lunch or dinner. (Pretty sure I even had it for breakfast a few times, too!)

I’ve tried this dish all over the subcontinent, and it’s something I used to cook at home when I lived in Amravati, too. I still cook it regularly here in Berlin – and I’ve made it more than a few times for dinner parties and other events. Other unforgettable culinary experiences with Chilli Tofu were at a temple restaurant in Sri Lanka (they also made a spicy Chilli Kottu with sliced roti instead of tofu or paneer), at the legendary Hasty Tasty in Darjeeling, and from some grubby, but wonderful eatery in “downtown” Varkala.

This recipe is one that I’ve upgraded and improved for the new edition of my WORLD cookbook. The recipe first appeared in my original The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures cookbook back in 2012 (And in German in 2013).

Obviously you can swap out the vegetables and use broccoli or cauliflower, for example, instead of red and green peppers. Another fun variation is to swap in chopped potatoes for the tofu pieces, effectively making Chilli Potatoes, another Indo-Chinese dish you might find on the “Chinese” pages of many restaurant menus in India.

If you’re feeling bold… double the spices and use twice as much chopped garlic, ginger, and green chilies. You’ll want to tweak the salt, sugar, and lemon/lime juice amounts, too.

Chilli Tofu-Paneer goes great with some steamed rice, or you can eat it with flatbreads like naan and chapati/roti. Roll it up and make a wrap and it’s almost like a Kati Roll!

Chilli Tofu Paneer

Indo-Chinese sweet & sour tofu 

serves 2 / time 45 min

Recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

tofu paneer:

  • 7 oz (200 g) tofu
  • 2 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce
  • 2 Tbs nutritional yeast flakes or chickpea flour (besan)
  • 2 Tbs corn starch
  • 2–3 Tbs coconut oil or vegetable oil
  1. Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in a dish towel. Weight with a cutting board for 15–20 min to remove excess moisture. Unwrap and cut into triangles or cubes
  2. Combine lemon juice, soy sauce, nutritional yeast flakes (or chickpea flour), and corn starch in bowl. 
    Add tofu cubes, mix well, coat all pieces.
  3. Heat oil in a small frying pan on medium high. Fry battered cubes in batches until evenly golden brown, turning regularly, 4–6 min. Remove, drain, set aside.

vegetables & sauce:

  • 2 medium (150 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 1/2 medium (90 g) red pepper chopped
  • 1/2 medium (80 g) green pepper chopped
  • 2/3 cup (100 g) fresh pineapple chopped
  • 1 medium (120 g) onion chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1 in (3 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 1–2 green chilies seeded, sliced
  • 2–3 spring onions chopped, for garnish
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper ground
  • 1 tsp paprika ground
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1 Tbs lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbs sugar
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) water
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce
  • 1 Tbs corn starch
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  1. Heat oil in a large pan or wok on medium high heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to pop
    (20–30 sec), add chopped onion, garlic, ginger, green chilies, ground black pepper, coriander,
    paprika, and turmeric. Fry while stirring until richly aromatic, 2–3 min.
  2. Add chopped tomatoes, red and green peppers, pineapple, lemon juice (or rice vinegar), and sugar.
    Stir-fry on medium heat until tomatoes fall apart and peppers and pineapple are scorched, 4–6 min.
  3. Whisk water and soy sauce with corn starch in a bowl. Gradually pour mixture into sizzling vegetables while stirring. Stir in salt and cook, stirring constantly, until sauce thickens, 2–3 min.
  4. Stir in fried tofu cubes and coat them with sauce. Simmer on low heat, stirring regularly, another 2–3 min.
  5. Garnish with chopped spring onions and serve with rice.

Variations:

Vedic: Replace chopped onion and garlic with 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing) and 1/2 tsp Garam Masala, followed by another chopped small tomato along with red and green peppers.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover
Chilli Tofu Paneer

Chili Tofu Paneer

Indochinesischer pikanter süßsaurer Tofu 

2 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

Tofu-Paneer:

  • 200 g Tofu
  • 2 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Sojasoße
  • 2 EL Hefeflocken oder Kichererbsenmehl (Besan)
  • 2 EL Speisestärke
  • 2–3 EL Kokos- oder Pflanzenöl
  1. Tofu in dicke Scheiben schneiden, in ein sauberes Geschirrtuch wickeln und 15 bis 20 Min. mit einem Schneidebrett beschweren, um überschüssige Flüssigkeit herauszupressen. Auswickeln und in Dreiecke
    oder Würfel schneiden.
  2. Zitronensaft, Sojasoße, Hefeflocken oder Kichererbsenmehl und Stärke in einer Rührschüssel verrühren. Tofuwürfel hinzufügen und mit der Mischung überziehen.
  3. Öl in einer kleinen Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Mit Teig überzogene Würfel in mehreren Durchgängen 4 bis 6 Min. gleichmäßig goldbraun braten, dabei regelmäßig wenden.
    Aus der Pfanne nehmen, abtropfen lassen und beiseite stellen.

Gemüse & Soße:

  • 2 mittelgroße (150 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 1/2 mittelgroße (90 g) rote Paprika gehackt
  • 1/2 mittelgroße (80 g) grüne Paprika gehackt
  • 100 g frische Ananas gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (120 g) Zwiebel gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 3 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1–2 grüne Chilischoten geschnitten
  • 2–3 Frühlingszwiebeln gehackt, zum Garnieren
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1/2 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 1 TL Paprikapulver
  • 1/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft oder 2 TL Reisessig
  • 1 EL Zucker
  • 1/2 Tasse (120 ml) Wasser
  • 1 EL Sojasoße
  • 1 EL Speisestärke
  • 1/2 TL Salz
  1. Öl in einer großen Pfanne oder einem Wok auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben.
    Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Ingwer, grüne Chilischoten, schwarzen Pfeffer, Koriander, Paprikapulver und Kurkuma hinzufügen und 2 bis 3 Min. unter Rühren anbraten,
    bis es aromatisch duftet.
  2. Tomaten, rote und grüne Paprika, Ananas, Zitronensaft oder Reisessig und Zucker einrühren.
    4 bis 6 Min. braten, bis die Tomaten zerfallen und die Paprika und Ananas angeschmort sind.
  3. Wasser, Sojasoße und Speisestärke in einer Schüssel verrühren. Flüssigkeit nach und nach unter das Gemüse rühren. Salz zugeben und 2 bis 3 Min. unter ständigem Rühren weiterköcheln, bis die Soße eindickt.
  4. Tofuwürfel zum Gemüse geben und mit der Soße überziehen. Auf niedriger Flamme 2 bis 3 weitere Min. unter Rühren köcheln.
  5. Mit Frühlingszwiebelringen garnieren und mit Reis servieren.

Variationen:

Vedisch: Zwiebel und Knoblauch mit 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant) und 1/2 TL Garam Masala ersetzen.
Zusätzlich dazu 1 weitere kleine gehackte Tomate mit der grünen und roten Paprika zugeben.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Masoor Dal

Masoor Dal

Masoor Dal is one of the most classic and common dishes in Indian cuisine, and there are plenty of reasons for that – it’s easy to make, delicious, is universally loved, goes with just about any thali set meal combo, and is packed with protein and nutrients. Did I mention it’s easy to make? Yeah, it’s simple. And you can make it more simple, or more fancy, as you like. Want more vegetables? Go for it. Other beans? Knock yourself out. In the variations I mention a couple typical twists: You can drop the onion and garlic and make the vedic (sattvic) variation with asafoetida, and/or you can make a more South Indian / Sri Lankan style dal by adding creamy coconut milk – or just 1–2 Tbs coconut cream.

Masoor Dal means red lentils. A lot of times you’ll see it called just Dal, which literally means (wait for it) lentils – but dal served as a dish can be made from any number of legumes, including split red lentils, yellow lentils, pigeon peas (toor dal), mung beans (mung dal), etc.

For any dinner party or special Indian meal I almost always include a Dal dish, and it’s usually this one. In fact, we make this at home at least once a week – it’s quite a family favorite! If you (or the kids) prefer a super smooth dal, cook the lentils for a good long time, adding water gradually to get them really soft, or purée the cooked lentils in a blender and transfer back to the pot.

This dish is very similar to Dal Tadka (or Dal Tarka), also known as Dal Fry – the fried tempering or ‘tadka’ is added to the pot of already cooked lentils towards the end of cooking. Follow that up with salt, lime juice, and chopped fresh coriander or dried fenugreek leaves. If you can find fresh fenugreek leaves, that’s even better… but they are typically tricky (but not impossible) to find outside South Asia.

It’s also possible to fry the spices first in a large pot and then add the (dry) lentils and water, bring it to boil, and cook it all in one pot. I do this sometimes when I’m in a hurry, but adding the fried tempering at the end is definitely more classic and true to the methods taught to me in India by friends, neighbors, and cooks that let me into their kitchens!

Masoor Dal

North Indian red lentils

serves 4 / time 45 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

  • 3/4 cup (125 g) red lentils (dried)
  • 4 cups (1000 ml) water more as needed
  • 1 medium (100 g) tomato chopped
  • 1 small (60 g) red onion finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic finely chopped
  • 3/4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 1 small green chili seeded, sliced optional
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 2 tsp cumin ground
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing)
  • 1 cinnamon stick or 1/4 tsp cinnamon ground
  • 4–6 curry leaves or 1 bay leaf
  • 3/4 tsp turmeric ground
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbs lime juice
  • small handful fresh coriander or dried fenugreek leaves for garnish
  1. Rinse and drain lentils. Bring 3 cups (720 ml) water to boil in a large pot. Add drained lentils.
    Return to boil, reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer until lentils are very soft, 15–25 min.
  2. Heat oil in a small pan on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to pop (20–30 sec),
    add chopped onion, garlic, ginger, chili (if using), ground coriander, cumin, asafoetida, cinnamon, and curry leaves or bay leaf. Fry, stirring constantly, until richly aromatic, 2–3 min.
  3. Add fried spices along with chopped tomato, turmeric and salt to pot with cooked lentils.
    Return to boil. Simmer 5–10 min, gradually stirring in another 1 cup (240 ml) water (or coconut milk,
    see Variations below) or more, as needed.
  4. Remove cinnamon stick and bay leaf (if using). Stir in lime juice. Adjust salt to taste. For an extra
    smooth dal, transfer to a blender or use an immersion blender and blend to desired consistency.
  5. Garnish with chopped coriander or fenugreek leaves.
  6. Serve with basmati rice, naan, or chapati bread.

Variations:

Vedic: Omit onions and garlic, use 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing), and add 3/4 tsp Garam Masala along with spices. Coconut creamy:  Add 1 cup (240 ml) coconut milk instead of water in last steps. 

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch
Masoor Dal

Masoor Dal

Nordindische rote Linsen

4 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

  • 3/4 Tasse (125 g) rote Linsen (getrocknet)
  • 4 Tassen (1000 ml) Wasser bei Bedarf mehr
  • 1 mittelgroße (100 g) Tomate gehackt
  • 1 kleine (60 g) rote Zwiebel fein gehackt
  • 1 Knoblauchzehe fein gehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 kleine grüne Chilischote entsamt, in Scheibchen geschnitten wenn gewünscht
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 2 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant)
  • 1 Zimtstange oder 1/4 TL Zimt gemahlen
  • 4–6 Curryblätter oder 1 Lorbeerblatt
  • 3/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 3/4 TL Salz
  • 1 EL Limettensaft
  • 1 kleine Handvoll frisches Koriandergrün
    oder getrocknete Bockshornkleeblätter zum Garnieren
  1. Linsen gründlich waschen und abtropfen lassen. 3 Tassen (720 ml) Wasser in einem großen Topf zum Kochen bringen. Linsen hineingeben und erneut zum Kochen bringen. Flamme niedrig stellen, abdecken und 15 bis 25 Min. köcheln, bis die Linsen sehr weich sind.
  2. Öl in einer kleinen Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben.
    Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Ingwer, grüne Chilischote (falls verwendet) Koriander, Kreuzkümmel, Asafoetida, Zimt und Curryblätter oder Lorbeerblatt hinzufügen.
    2 bis 3 Min. rösten, bis es aromatisch duftet.
  3. Geröstete Gewürze, Tomate, Kurkuma und Salz in den Topf mit den Linsen geben. Zum Kochen bringen,
    Flamme niedrig stellen und 5 bis 10 Min. köcheln. Dabei nach und nach 1 Tasse (240 ml) Wasser
    (oder Kokosmilch, siehe Variationen) oder bei Bedarf mehr einrühren.
  4. Zimtstange und Lorbeerblatt (falls verwendet) entfernen und Limettensaft einrühren. Abschmecken und auf Wunsch nachsalzen. Für ein extra cremiges Dal die Suppe in einem Mixer oder mit einem Pürierstab direkt im Topf pürieren, bis die gewünschte Konsistenz erreicht ist.
  5. Mit frischem gehacktem Koriandergrün oder Bockshornkleeblättern garnieren und mit
    Basmati-Reis, Naan oder Chapati (Roti) servieren.

Variationen:

Vedisch: Statt Zwiebel und Knoblauch 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant) verwenden und 3/4 TL Garam Masala zusammen mit den anderen Gewürzen zugeben. Cremig mit Kokosnuss: Statt 1 Tasse (240 ml) Wasser bei den letzten Schritten 1 Tasse (240 ml) Kokosmilch einrühren.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Vegetable Manchurian

Vegetable Manchurian

There are a myriad of cuisines across the Indian subcontinent, and thousands of amazing meals to experience in every corner of India. One of my most favorite of the international culinary hybrids is the wonder that is Indochinese. It’s actually pretty hard to find this unique cuisine outside of India, so a long time ago I took to making it myself in my kitchen – especially for guests. It’s a delicious, nostalgic and fun adventure every time.

In India, Indochinese food usually just known as Chinese – but anyone who’s been to China will quickly recognize stark differences from the food found over the northern border: Indochinese often incorporates many classic Indian flavors (particularly cumin, coriander, and even curry leaves), different ingredients – of course regularly honoring more common indigenous vegetables, and has a host of its own creations which don’t really exist in the source cuisine. Sort of like how American-Chinese food is quite different than actual Chinese food, and in the United States (and elsewhere) there are many “classic” Chinese dishes which are, in fact, original hybrid creations.

I’ve always found this intersection and exchange of different culinary traditions fascinating. In India, many times you go out for Chinese to have something other than typical Indian cuisine. Many Indian restaurants specialize in Chinese food – some entirely, and many with a dedicated page of the menu featuring Chinese dishes.

What’s cool about Vegetable Manchurian is that in many ways it’s more Indian than Chinese, and lends itself really well as an appetizer. Many places will ask you if you want it “dry” or “with gravy”. I always order Veg Manchurian “dry” – which, somewhat contrary to the name, just means with less (but not without) sauce. You can serve it first and follow up with Indochinese noodle or rice dishes, or dig right into more classic Indian fare.

Personally I love serving it with Indochinese Chili Tofu-Paneer and steamed basmati rice, or even jeera (cumin) rice. That’s a combo that I often got when traveling and living in India – especially at some of the amazing vegetarian restaurants I frequented – like Kalpavruksh and Grace Inn – in Amravati, Maharashtra.\

Talking with their cooks, as well as with friends of mine who started a vegetarian Chinese restaurant in town provided me with lots of valuable inspirations and ideas for this recipe, and many others in my WORLD 2.0 and INDIA cookbooks.

Vegetable Manchurian
Indo-Chinese dumplings

serves 2 to 3 / time 45 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

dumplings:

  • 1 1/2 cups (160 g) cabbage shredded / chopped
  • 1 large (120 g) carrot grated
  • 2/3 cup (90 g) flour (all-purpose / type 550)
  • 2 Tbs corn starch
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1/2 tsp ajwain or dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) water
  • vegetable oil for frying
  1. Toss shredded cabbage and grated carrot in a mixing bowl with flour, corn starch, ground turmeric, ajwain (or thyme), and salt.
  2. Gradually add water and combine well to form a sticky, clumpy batter.
  3. Heat 1–2 in (3–5 cm) oil in a small pot on medium high heat. The oil is hot enough when a small bit of batter sizzles and rises to the surface immediately.
  4. Form batter into walnut-sized pieces with damp hands. (If batter is too wet, mix in some more corn starch.
    If it’s too dry and pieces fall apart, add slightly more water.) Drop 5 to 6 pieces into hot oil quickly, but carefully. Do not crowd the oil. Fry, turning regularly, until dark golden brown, 4–6 minutes.
  5. Drain and transfer fried dumplings with a slotted spoon to a plate as they finish. Fry another batch or two of dumplings until batter is done.

sauce:

  • 1/2 cup (55 g) cabbage chopped
  • 2 medium (160 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 1 medium (90 g) red onion chopped
  • 1–2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1 in (3 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 1 green chili chopped optional
  • 2–3 spring onions chopped, for garnish
  • 1 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 1/2 tsp coriander ground
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper ground
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) soy sauce
  • 1 Tbs lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 1/4 cup (300 ml) water
  • 1 Tbs corn starch
  • 1 Tbs sugar
  1. Heat oil in a medium sauce pan on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to pop (20–30 sec), add chopped onion, garlic, ginger, green chili (if using), ground coriander, and black pepper.
    Fry, stirring constantly, until richly aromatic, 2–3 min.
  2. Stir in chopped cabbage and tomatoes. Continue to stir fry until tomatoes fall apart, 3–5 minutes.
  3. Whisk soy sauce, lemon juice (or rice vinegar), and water with corn starch and sugar.
    Gradually stir into sizzling vegetables. Bring to simmer. Reduce heat to low. Cook until thickened, 2–3 min.
  4. Add fried dumplings to thickened, simmering sauce. Mix gently to cover all pieces. Continue to simmer
    on low heat, partially covered, another 2–3 min. Remove from heat.
  5. Garnish with chopped spring onions. Serve as an appetizer or with steamed rice.
The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover
Vegetable Manchurian

Vegetable Manchurian
Indochinesische würzige Gemüebällchen

2 bis 3 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

Bällchen:

  • 1 1/2 Tassen (160 g) Weißkohl geraspelt
  • 1 große (120 g) Möhre geraspelt
  • 2/3 Tasse (90 g) Mehl (Type 550)
  • 2 EL Speisestärke
  • 1/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Ajowan oder getrockneter Thymian
  • 1/2 TL Salz
  • 1/4 Tasse (60 ml) Wasser
  • Pflanzenöl zum Frittieren
  1. Weißkohl, Möhre, Mehl, Stärke, Kurkuma, Ajowan oder Thymian und Salz in einer großen Schüssel
    gut vermischen.
  2. Nach und nach Wasser hinzufügen und zu einem klebrigen, teils klumpigen Teig rühren.
  3. Öl 3 bis 5 cm hoch in einen kleinen Topf geben und auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Wenn ein kleiner Tropfen Teig sofort brutzelnd an die Oberfläche steigt, hat das Öl die richtige Temperatur.
  4. Teig mit feuchten Händen zu walnussgroßen Bällchen formen. Ist der Teig zu feucht, mehr Stärke, ist er
    zu trocken und bröselig, etwas mehr Wasser unterrühren. 5 bis 6 Bällchen ins heiße Öl gleiten lassen.
    Topf nicht überladen. Bällchen 4 bis 6 Min. unter regelmäßigem Wenden ringsum goldbraun frittieren.
  5. Mit einem Schaumlöffel herausheben, abtropfen lassen und auf einen Teller legen.
    Restliche Bällchen zubereiten.

Soße:

  • 1/2 Tasse (55 g) Weißkohl gehackt
  • 2 mittelgroße (160 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (90 g) rote Zwiebel gehackt
  • 1 bis 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 3 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 grüne Chilischote gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • 2–3 Frühlingszwiebeln gehackt, zum Garnieren
  • 1 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1/2 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 1/2 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 1/4 Tasse (60 ml) Sojasoße
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft oder 2 TL Reisessig
  • 1 1/4 Tasse (300 ml) Wasser
  • 1 EL Speisestärke
  • 1 EL Zucker
  1. Öl in einem mittelgroßen Stieltopf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Ingwer, grüne Chilischote (falls verwendet), Koriander und schwarzen Pfeffer hineingeben. 2 bis 3 Min. unter Rühren anschwitzen, bis es aromatisch duftet.
  2. Weißkohl und Tomaten einrühren. 3 bis 5 Min. schmoren, bis die Tomaten zerfallen.
  3. Sojasoße, Zitronensaft oder Reisessig und Wasser mit Stärke und Zucker verrühren. Nach und nach
    ins köchelnde Gemüse einrühren und zum Köcheln bringen. Flamme niedrig stellen und 2 bis 3 Min. köcheln, bis die Soße eindickt.
  4. Frittierte Bällchen in die köchelnde Soße geben und vorsichtig darin wenden. 2 bis 3 weitere Min.
    halb abgedeckt auf niedriger Flamme köcheln. Vom Herd nehmen.
  5. Mit gehackten Frühlingszwiebeln garnieren. Als Vorspeise oder Hauptgericht mit Reis servieren.
The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Dal Makhani

This is my new and massively improved recipe for Dal Makhani, North Indian creamy black lentils and beans. A simpler version of the recipe was in my very first cookbook The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures. When I began recreating the cookbook for the WORLD 2.0 edition, I updated the recipe a bit and reshot the photograph. But several months later I was working on the recipe again trying to make it better – more authentic. I did more online research and went through all of my Indian cookbooks again and found a few new things to try.

One of the things I’ve learned in the last five years of cooking a lot more bean dishes – and even more Indian food – is to let beans and lentils cook slowly and for a long time. To really let the sauces simmer a while and definitely not rush things. (Working on the ETHIOPIA cookbook and cooking with With this particular dish I figured out that urid dal (black lentils) are definitely superior to using black beans – although using black beans or other beans is rather common both in India and especially outside of India in restaurants!

As always, freshly ground spices – especially cumin and coriander – are crucial to making a rich, aromatic curry. Black cardamom lends a delicious, deep smokey flavor. And some fresh, chopped coriander and lemon juice at the end really bring the dish to life.

Serve with hot, fresh chapati (roti) or other Indian flatbreads, or with warm, fluffy basmati rice.

Dal Makhani

North Indian creamy black lentils & beans

serves 3 to 4 / time 90 min +

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

(Rezept auf Deutsch unten)

  • 1 cup (185 g) whole urid dal (dried black lentils)
    or 3 cups (550 g) cooked black beans
  • 1/3 cup (65 g) kidney beans (dried)
    or 1 cup (180 g) cooked kidney beans
  • 3–4 cups (720–1000 ml) water more as needed 
  • 2 large (250 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 1 in (3 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic finely chopped optional
  • 1–2 green chilies seeded, sliced optional
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick or 1/4 tsp cinnamon ground
  • 1 black cardamom pods
    or 4 green cardamom pods
  • 2 tsp cumin ground
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1/2 tsp red chili powder or paprika (ground)
  • 1 tsp Garam Masala
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing)
  • 1 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 Tbs margarine
  • 1 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 cup (240 ml) soy cream or oat cream
  • small handful fresh coriander chopped, for garnish
  1. If using dried whole urid dal and kidney beans, rinse well and soak 8 hrs or overnight.
    Drain and discard soaking water. Add soaked dal, beans, and 4 cups (1000 ml) water to a large pot.
    Bring to boil and cook covered on low heat until soft, 1–2 hrs. Continue to simmer on low.
  2. If using cooked (e.g. canned) beans, rinse and drain them, then add to a large pot along with
    3 cups (720 ml) water. Bring to simmer on low heat.
  3. Purée chopped tomatoes in a blender or food processor. Stir into simmering lentils and/or beans.
  4. Heat oil in a small pan on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to pop (20–30 sec),
    add chopped ginger, garlic and green chilies (if using), bay leaves, cinnamon, cardamom,
    ground cumin, coriander, red chili powder (or paprika), Garam Masala, and asafoetida.
    Fry, stirring constantly, until richly aromatic, 1–2 min.
  5. Stir fried spices and oil from small pan into large pot of simmering lentils and/or beans.
    Simmer on low, mashing and stirring occasionally, 20–30 min, adding more water if needed.
  6. Stir in salt, margarine, lemon juice, sugar, and most of the soy (or oat) cream, saving some for garnish.
    Continue to simmer on low, stirring occasionally, another 5–10 min. Remove from heat.
  7. Drizzle with remaining soy (or oat) cream and garnish with chopped fresh coriander.
  8. Serve with basmati rice, naan, or chapati (roti).
Dal Makhani

Dal Makhani

Nordindische cremige schwarze Linsen & Bohnen

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 90 Min. +

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

  • 1 Tasse (185 g) Urid Dal (getrocknete, ganze schwarze Linsen)
    oder 3 Tassen (550 g) gekochte schwarze Bohnen
  • 1/3 Tasse (65 g) Kidneybohnen (getrocknet)
    oder 1 Tasse (180 g) gekochte Kidneybohnen
  • 3–4 Tassen (720–1000 ml) Wasser bei Bedarf mehr
  • 2 große (250 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • 1 grüne Chilischote entsamt, in Scheibchen geschnitten wenn gewünscht
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 2 Lorbeerblätter
  • 1 Zimtstange oder 1/4 TL Zimt gemahlen
  • 1 schwarze Kardamomkapsel or 4 grüne Kardamomkapsel
  • 2 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1 TL Chili- oder Paprikapulver
  • 1 TL Garam Masala
  • 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant)
  • 1 1/4 TL Salz
  • 2 EL Margarine
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1 TL Zucker
  • 1 Tasse (240 ml) Soja- oder Hafersahne
  • 1 kleine Handvoll frisches Koriandergrün gehackt, zum Garnieren
  1. Getrocknete Urid Dal (schwarze Linsen) und Kidneybohnen gründlich waschen und über Nacht einweichen.
    Abgießen und mit 4 Tassen (1000 ml) Wasser in einen großen Topf geben. Zum Kochen bringen und auf niedriger Flamme 90–120 min. weich kochen. Auf niedriger Flamme weiterköcheln lassen.
  2. Gekochte Bohnen (z. B. aus der Dose) abgießen, spülen, abtropfen lassen und mit 3 Tassen
    (720 ml) Wasser in einen großen Topf geben. Auf niedriger Flamme zum Köcheln bringen.
  3. Tomaten in einem Mixer oder einer Küchenmaschine pürieren und unter die köchelnden Bohnen rühren.
  4. Öl in einer kleinen Pfanne auf niedriger Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben.
    Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) Ingwer, Knoblauch, Chilischote (falls verwendet), Lorbeerblätter, Zimt, Kardamom, Kreuzkümmel, Koriander, Chili- oder Paprikapulver, Garam Masala und Asafoetida hinzufügen. 1 bis 2 Min. unter Rühren anschwitzen, bis es aromatisch duftet.
  5. Gewürzmix in den Topf zu den Linsen/Bohnen geben und umrühren. Auf niedriger Flamme unter
    gelegentlichem Stampfen und Rühren 20 bis 30 Min. köcheln. Bei Bedarf etwas mehr Wasser einrühren.
  6. Salz, Margarine, Zitronensaft, Zucker und den Großteil der Soja– oder Hafersahne unterrühren
    (ein bisschen zum Garnieren aufbewahren). Weitere 5 bis 10 Min. unter gelegentlichem Umrühren
    auf niedriger Flamme köcheln. Vom Herd nehmen.
  7. Mit der restlichen Soja– oder Hafersahne und frischem gehacktem Koriandergrün garnieren.
  8. Mit Basmati-Reis, Naan oder Chapati (Roti) servieren.

Tofu Scramble

Tofu Scramble

This is another recipe which I’ve worked on and improved over the last few decades. I started making Tofu Scramble when I was a teenager, back in the 1990s. Back then there was this pretty bad Tofu Scramble mix you could buy in a box from the health food store. Very quickly I learned how to make my own using spices and vegetables and some chickpea flour (Besan). Over the years I figured out that tapioca starch works better for a smooth, gooey, almost cheesy coating on the otherwise crispy and chewy, lightly charred crumbled tofu and chopped vegetables.

Adding Kala Namak (black salt) is another trick that I worked in a few years ago — it lends a somewhat egg flavor and aroma. I very often make the Vedic Indian variation of this — using some curry leaves, asafoetida, and other spices, but omitting the chopped onion.

I typically serve this on a green leafy salad with some toast or fresh bread on the side. It’s a fantastic and satisfying breakfast or brunch dish!

Tofu Scramble
with mixed vegetables

serves 3 to 4 / time 30 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0
(Rezept auf Deutsch unten!)

  • 14 oz (400 g) firm tofu crumbled
  • 2 medium (200 g) potatoes peeled, chopped
  • 1 medium (100 g) carrot peeled, chopped
  • 1 cup (100 g) broccoli chopped
  • 7–8 small (90 g) cherry tomatoes chopped
  • 1 small (70 g) onion chopped 
  • 2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1/2 tsp cumin ground
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper ground
  • 1/4 tsp paprika ground
  • 3/4 tsp turmeric ground
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary and/or thyme chopped
  • 1–2 Tbs margarine or water
  • 1–2 Tbs tapioca starch or chickpea flour (besan)
  • 1 Tbs nutritional yeast flakes optional
  • 3/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp kala namak (black salt) optional
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • fresh parsley or other herbs chopped, for garnish
  1. Heat oil in a large pan on medium heat.
  2. Add chopped onion. Fry, stirring often, until onion starts to soften, 2–3 min.
  3. Add chopped potatoes and carrot, followed byground cumin, black pepper, and paprika.
    Fry, stirring regularly, until potatoes begin to soften, 5–7 min.
  4. Stir in crumbled tofu, ground turmeric, and rosemary and/or thyme. Fry 2–3 min, stirring regularly.
  5. Add chopped broccoli and tomato. Cook, partially covered, stirring regularly, until broccoli begins to soften and tomatoes fall apart, 3–5 min.
  6. Stir in 1–2 Tbs margarine (or water). Mix in tapioca starch (or chickpea flour), nutritional yeast, and salt. Continue to cook, stirring, until liquid is gone and potatoes are soft, 3–5 min.
  7. Add kala namak (if using) and lemon juice. Mix well. Turn off heat. Cover and let sit 5 min.
  8. Garnish with fresh parsley (or other herbs) and serve.

Variations:

More vegetables: Add chopped mushrooms and/or half a red, green, or yellow pepper along with broccoli. Adjust spices and salt as needed. Sweet potatoes: Substitute for regular potatoes. Vedic Indian: Replace onion with 1 tsp black mustard seeds, 1/2 tsp fenugreek seeds, several curry leaves, and 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing), followed almost immediately by chopped potatoes, carrots, and other spices.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - WORLD 2.0 Vegan Cookbook cover
Tofu Scramble

Tofu Scramble
Rührtofu mit Gemüse

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 30 Min.

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

  • 400 g fester Tofu zerkrümelt
  • 2 mittelgroße (200 g) Kartoffeln geschält, gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (100 g) Möhre geschält, gehackt
  • 1 Tasse (100 g) Brokkoli gehackt
  • 6–8 kleine (80 g) Cherrytomaten gehackt
  • 1 kleine (70 g) Zwiebel gehackt
  • 2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1/2 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL Paprikapulver
  • 3/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 2 Zweige frischer Rosmarin und/oder Thymian
  • 1–2 EL Margarine oder Wasser
  • 1–2 EL Tapiokastärke oder Kichererbsenmehl (Besan)
  • 1 EL Hefeflocken wenn gewünscht
  • 3/4 TL Meersalz
  • 1/2 TL Kala Namak (Schwarzsalz) wenn gewünscht
  • 2 TL Zitronensaft
  • frische Petersilie oderandere frische Kräuter gehackt, zum Garnieren
  1. Öl in einer großen Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen.
  2. Zwiebel hineingeben und 2 bis 3 Min. unter Rühren anschwitzen, bis sie weich wird.
  3. Kartoffeln und Möhre zugeben. Kreuzkümmel, schwarzen Pfeffer und Paprikapulver einrühren.
    5 bis 7 Min. unter regelmäßigem Rühren braten, bis die Kartoffeln weich werden.
  4. Tofu, Kurkuma und Rosmarin und/oder Thymian einrühren. 2 bis 3 Min. unter Rühren braten.
  5. Brokkoli und Tomaten zugeben. 3 bis 5 Min. halb abgedeckt unter regelmäßigem Rühren schmoren,
    bis der Brokkoli weich wird und die Tomate zerfällt.
  6. 1 bis 2 EL Margarine oder Wasser einrühren. Tapiokastärke oder Kichererbsenmehl, Hefeflocken,
    und Salz unterrühren. 3 bis 5 weitere Min. unter Rühren braten, bis die Flüssigkeit eingekocht ist und
    die Kartoffeln richtig durch sind.
  7. Kala Namak (falls verwendet) und Zitronensaft einrühren. Flamme abstellen, abdecken und
    5 Min. ziehen lassen.
  8. Mit gehackter Petersilie oder anderen Kräutern garnieren und servieren.
  9. Variationen:

Mehr Gemüse: Gehackte Pilze und/oder eine halbe rote, grüne oder gelbe Paprika zusammen mit dem Brokkoli zugeben. Gewürz- und Salzmenge nach Bedarf anpassen. Süßkartoffeln: Statt Kartoffeln verwenden. Vedisch-indisch: Zwiebel mit 1 TL schwarzen Senfsamen, 1/2 TL Bockshornkleesamen, ein paar Curryblättern und 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant) ersetzen. Direkt nach Kartoffeln, Möhre und anderen Gewürzen zugeben.

The Lotus and the Artichoke - Vegane Rezepte eines Weltreisenden WORLD 2.0 veganes Kochbuch

Palak Tofu Paneer

Palak (Saag) Paneer

My recipe for Palak Paneer is something I’ve worked on and been improving for decades. This is the newest recipe which is in the fully updated, expanded, re-photographed and re-illustrated WORLD 2.0 edition of my original cookbook.

I’ve been making vegan tofu paneer for a long time, and this is my trusty recipe for all Indian vegan dishes that call for it, including Matar Paneer, Chili Paneer, and Paneer Makhani. (These recipes are also in my WORLD 2.0 cookbook and several others with paneer are in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA.)

Palak Paneer is a dish that I’ve prepared for countless dinner parties and cooked many times in live cooking shows. I’ve also included it in several cooking classes I’ve done.

I strongly recommend making it with fresh spinach. In a hurry you can use frozen (thawed) spinach, but fresh is really best!

Check out the variations! Usually I make this with more tomatoes and using cashews to make the sauce creamier. This recipe works really well for Saag Aloo (Palak Aloo) using potatoes instead of tofu paneer!

Palak Tofu Paneer

North Indian spinach with tofu paneer

serves 2 / time 45 min

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – WORLD 2.0

(Rezept auf Deutsch unten!)

tofu paneer:

  • 7 oz (200 g) tofu
  • 2 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce
  • 2 Tbs nutritional yeast flakes or chickpea flour (besan)
  • 2 Tbs corn starch
  • 2–3 Tbs coconut oil or vegetable oil
  1. Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in a dish towel. Weight with a cutting board for 15–20 min to remove excess moisture. Unwrap and cut into triangles or cubes
  2. Combine lemon juice, soy sauce, nutritional yeast flakes (or chickpea flour), and corn starch in bowl. 
    Add tofu cubes, mix well, coat all pieces.
  3. Heat oil in a small frying pan on medium high. Fry battered cubes evenly in batches until golden brown, turning regularly, 4–6 min. Remove, drain, set aside.

palak (spinach) curry:

  • 4 cups (7 oz / 200 g) spinach chopped
  • 2 medium (180 g) tomatoes chopped
  • 1 small (70 g) red onion chopped optional
  • 1 clove garlic finely chopped optional
  • 1/2 in (1 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 1 small green chili seeded, sliced optional
  • fresh coriander leaves chopped, for garnish
  • 1 cup (240 ml) soy milk or water
  • 1 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1–2 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 4–6 curry leaves
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1 tsp cumin ground
  • 1/2 tsp Garam Masala
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric ground
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing) optional
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  1. Blend chopped tomatoes and soy milk (or water) in a blender or food processor until smooth.
  2. Heat oil in a large pot on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. After they start to pop (20–30 sec), stir in chopped onion and garlic (if using), ginger, green chili (if using), curry leaves, ground coriander, cumin, Garam Masala, turmeric, and asafoetida. Fry, stirring often, until richly aromatic, 2–3 min.
  3. Stir in blended tomatoes, sugar, and salt. Bring to simmer and reduce to low heat. Cook 10–15 min.
  4. Add spinach. Mix well. Partially cover and simmer until spinach has shrunk and is mostly cooked, 4–6 min.
  5. For a smoother curry: Remove from heat, blend briefly with an immersion blender. Alternately, transfer curry to blender and pulse a few times on low, then return to pot.
  6. Stir in fried tofu cubes and lemon juice. Simmer on low, partially covered, 4–5 min. Remove from heat.
  7. Garnish with chopped fresh coriander. Serve with basmati rice, chapati (roti), or naan.

Variations:

Aloo Palak: Fry 2–3 chopped medium potatoes until golden brown and soft. Add to simmering spinach curry instead of fried tofu cubes. Coconut: Replace soy milk with coconut milk. Rich & Creamy: Blend tomatoes with 2–3 Tbs cashews and 1 Tbs tomato paste. For all variations, adjust water and salt as needed.

Palak (Saag) Paneer

Palak Tofu Paneer

Nordindischer Spinat mit Tofu-Paneer

2 Portionen / Dauer 45 Min.

Tofu-Paneer:

  • 200 g Tofu
  • 2 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Sojasoße
  • 2 EL Hefeflocken oder Kichererbsenmehl (Besan)
  • 2 EL Speisestärke
  • 2–3 EL Kokos- oder Pflanzenöl
  1. Tofu in dicke Scheiben schneiden, in ein sauberes Geschirrtuch wickeln und 15 bis 20 Min. mit einem Schneidebrett beschweren, um überschüssige Flüssigkeit herauszupressen. Auswickeln und in Dreiecke
    oder Würfel schneiden.
  2. Zitronensaft, Sojasoße, Hefeflocken oder Kichererbsenmehl und Stärke in einer Rührschüssel verrühren. Tofuwürfel hinzufügen und mit der Mischung überziehen.
  3. Öl in einer kleinen Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Mit Teig überzogene Würfel in mehreren Durchgängen 4 bis 6 Min. gleichmäßig goldbraun braten, dabei regelmäßig wenden. Aus der Pfanne nehmen, abtropfen lassen und beiseite stellen.

Palak- (Spinat-) Curry:

  • 4 Tassen (200 g) Spinat gehackt
  • 2 mittelgroße (180 g) Tomaten gehackt
  • 1 kleine (70 g) rote Zwiebel gehacktwenn gewünscht
  • 1 Knoblauchzehe fein gehacktwenn gewünscht
  • 1 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 grüne Chilischote gehacktwenn gewünscht
  • frisches Koriandergrün gehackt, zum Garnieren
  • 1 Tasse (240 ml) Sojamilch oder Wasser
  • 1 EL Zitronensaft
  • 1–2 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL schwarze Senfsamen
  • 4–6 Curryblätter
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1 TL Kreuzkümmel gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL Garam Masala
  • 1/4 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 1/4 TL Asafoetida (Asant) wenn gewünscht
  • 1 TL Zucker

3/4 TL Salz

  1. Tomaten und Sojamilch oder Wasser in einem Mixer oder einer Küchenmaschine glatt pürieren.
  2. Öl in einem großen Topf auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Senfsamen hineingeben. Nach deren Aufplatzen (20 bis 30 Sek.) Zwiebel, Knoblauch, Ingwer, Chilischote (falls verwendet), Curryblätter, Koriander, Kreuzkümmel, Garam Masala, Kurkuma und Asafoetida hinzufügen und 2 bis 3 Min. unter häufigem Rühren anschwitzen, bis es aromatisch duftet.
  3. Pürierte Tomaten, Zucker und Salz einrühren. Zum Köcheln bringen. Flamme niedrig stellen und
    10 bis 15 Min. köcheln.
  4. Spinat einrühren. Halb abgedeckt 4 bis 6 Min. köcheln, bis der Spinat zusammengefallen und fast gar ist.
  5. Cremigeres Curry: Vom Herd nehmen und kurz mit einem Pürierstab durchmixen. Alternativ einige Male
    in einem Mixer häckseln und zurück in den Topf geben.
  6. Tofustücke und Zitronensaft unterrühren. Halb abgedeckt 4 bis 5 Min. köcheln. Vom Herd nehmen.
  7. Mit frischem gehacktem Koriandergrün garnieren und mit Basmati-Reis, Chapati (Roti) oder Naan servieren.

Variationen:

Aloo Palak: 2 bis 3 gehackte mittelgroße Kartoffeln goldbraun und weich braten und statt Tofu ins köchelnde Spinat-Curry einrühren. Kokos: Soja- mit Kokosmilch ersetzen. Cremiger: Tomaten mit 2 bis 3 EL Cashewkernen und 1 EL Tomatenmark pürieren. Bei allen Variationen Wasser- und Salzmenge nach Bedarf anpassen.

Nasi Goreng

Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook

I couldn’t even tell you how many times I had Nasi Goreng while I was in Malaysia.

It was definitely often. Like, really often. Not only is this traditional vegetable fried rice dish usually totally delicious, it’s also usually easy to find and (with little to no effort) a great vegan option.

Pretty much everywhere I went in the five weeks in Malaysia, this dish was on the menu or easy to order at almost any restaurant. Especially out of the big cities and in the countryside – and particularly on the islands and beaches – this is a vegan/vegetarian stand-by that is never hard to find.

(By the way, based on my travels, this is true for most of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar… but the dish is found under other names and with local flavors.)

This becomes an almost daily meal, if vegan options are limited.

On Pulau Pangkor, there were two food places (more shacks than restaurants) that served fantastic Nasi Goreng and vegetable fried rice. And in Borneo, staying in the Permai rainforest, the local restaurant and the nearby food court had vegetable fried rice, or Nasi Goreng. There were also many breakfast or lunch buffets at hotels and restaurants that had rice dishes like this. Contrarily, when in Penang and Kuala Lumpur I was usually so blown away by other vegan choices that I didn’t eat Nasi Goreng as often.

Nasi Goreng’s flavors and textures forge powerful memories for anyone who’s been to Malaysia or Indonesia – or even just a Malaysian or Indonesian restaurant – whether vegan, vegetarian, or neither.

Just as with so many classic recipes – from region to region and family to family this dish is made a million different ways. This is mine… inspired by so many excellent meals on my adventures.

When I created this recipe for the Malaysia cookbook, I made sure to hit all the best, unique flavors in a good Nasi Goreng:

Fresh galangal root (or ginger), lime juice, spicy chili, and a thin, tangy sauce provided by the mix of Shoyu soy sauce, vinegar, and citrus zest. I also round out the savory flavors with some sweetness. Traditionally in Malaysia, this dish would be served with just a bit of chopped vegetables (and way more rice). For my recipe, I’ve got a lot of the good stuff, included the crumbled tofu – which, by the way, replaces scrambled egg – sometimes found in traditional Nasi Goreng.

By the way, I have many similar recipes inspired by other travels and other countries and cuisines – including: Cambodian Fried RiceMexican Magic Rice, and Vegetable Fried Rice from my World, Mexico, and Sri Lanka vegan cookbooks. After you’ve tried my Nasi Goreng, check out the other recipes and decide which country’s classic fried rice is your favorite.

Nasi Goreng - LotusArtichoke Instagram

Nasi Goreng

traditional vegetable fried rice

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German

serves 2 to 3 / time 40 min +

  • 3.5 oz (100 g) firm tofu
  • 1 cup (190 g) broken jasmine rice or short grain brown rice
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 2/3 cup (400 ml) water
  • 1 cup (100 g) chinese cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli or bok choy finely chopped
  • 1 medium (90 g) carrot finely chopped or sliced
  • 2–3 Tbs oil
  • 1 tsp sesame oil optional
  • 3 (50 g) spring onions chopped, separated into white ends and greens
  • 1 or 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1 large red chili finely chopped optional
  • 1/2 in. (1 cm) fresh galangal or ginger finely chopped
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper ground
  • 2 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu)
  • 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice
    or 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tsp lime zest or lemon zest optional
  • 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • lime slices for garnish
  1. Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with heavy cutting boards to press out excess moisture. Let sit 20 min. Unwrap tofu and crumble into a bowl.
  2. Wash and drain rice thoroughly.
  3. Bring water to boil in a small pot. Add rice and salt. Stir. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 12 to 20 min as needed. After water is absorbed, remove from heat. Fluff rice with a fork. Cover and let sit and cool, ideally an hour or more.
  4. Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan on medium high. Add chopped spring onion ends, garlic, chili (if using), galangal (or ginger), ground coriander, and black pepper. Fry, stirring constantly, until lightly browned, 2–3 min.
  5. Add chopped carrots. Fry, stirring constantly, 2–3 min. Add crumbled tofu. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu begins to turn golden brown, 3–5 min. Add chopped cabbage (or other vegetables). Fry, stirring constantly, until vegetables start to soften, 4–5 min.
  6. Whisk soy sauce, lime (or lemon) juice, zest, sugar (or agave syrup), and sea salt in a small bowl.
  7. Add cooked rice to frying vegetables. Mix well. Add soy sauce mix and spring onions greens. Combine well. Fry, stirring constantly until liquid has been absorbed and rice and vegetables are moderately browned, 5–7 min. Remove from heat. Cover until ready to serve.
  8. Serve with lime slices.
vegan recipe for Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA
Malaysia vegan cookbook cover blockprint

Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook

Nasi Goreng

traditionelles Gemüse-Reis-Gericht

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

2 bis 3 Portionen / Dauer 40 Min.+

  • 100 g fester Tofu
  • 1 Tasse (190 g) Bruch- oder brauner Rundkornreis
  • 1/2 TL Meersalz
  • 1 2/3 Tasse (400 ml) Wasser
  • 1 Tasse (100 g) Chinakohl, Blumenkohl, Brokkoli oder Pak Choi fein gehackt
  • 1 mittelgroße (90 g) Möhre fein gehackt oder in dünne Streifen geschnitten
  • 2–3 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 1 TL Sesamöl wenn gewünscht
  • 3 mittelgroße (50 g) Frühlingszwiebeln gehackt, in weiße Wurzel- und grüne Lauchteile getrennt
  • 1 oder 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 1 große rote Chilischote fein gehackt wenn gewünscht
  • 1 cm frischer Galgant oder Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1/2 TL schwarzer Pfeffer gemahlen
  • 2 EL Sojasoße (Shoyu)
  • 1 EL Limetten- oder Zitronensaft oder 2 TL Reisessig
  • 1 TL Limetten- oder Zitronenabrieb wenn gewünscht
  • 1 TL Zucker oder Agavensirup
  • 1/2 TL Meersalz
  • Limettenspalten zum Garnieren
  1. Tofu in Platten schneiden und in ein sauberes Geschirrtuch wickeln. 20 Min. mit einem schweren Schneidebrett beschweren, um überschüssige Flüssigkeit herauszupressen. Tofu auswickeln und in eine Schüssel krümeln.
  2. Reis gründlich waschen und abgießen.
  3. In einem kleinen Topf Wasser zum Kochen bringen. Reis und Salz einrühren. Erneut zum Kochen bringen. Flamme niedrigstellen und abdecken. Je nach Bedarf 12 bis 20 Min. köcheln, bis der Reis gar ist. Wenn das Wasser absorbiert ist, Reis vom Herd nehmen. Mit einer Gabel lockern. Abdecken, abkühlen und ziehen lassen, am besten eine Stunde oder länger.
  4. In einem großen Wok oder einer großen Pfanne Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Gehackte Frühlingszwiebelwurzeln, Knoblauch, Chili (falls verwendet), Galgant oder Ingwer, Koriander und schwarzen Pfeffer hineingeben. 2 bis 3 Minuten unter ständigem Rühren braten, bis die Frühlingszwiebeln leicht gebräunt sind.
  5. Möhre zugeben. Unter ständigem Rühren 2 bis 3 weitere Min. braten. Zerkrümelten Tofu einrühren. Unter regelmäßigem Rühren 3 bis 5 Min. braten, bis der Tofu goldbraun ist. Kohl oder anderes Gemüse hinzufügen. Weiter 4 bis 5 Min. unter ständigem Rühren braten, bis das Gemüse weich wird.
  6. In einer kleinen Schüssel Sojasoße, Limetten– oder Zitronensaft und –abrieb (falls verwendet), Zucker oder Agavensirup und Meersalz verquirlen.
  7. Reis unters gebratene Gemüse rühren. Sojasoßenmix und grüne Frühlingszwiebelstücke zugeben. Gut umrühren und 5 bis 7 Min. unter ständigem Rühren braten, bis die Flüssigkeit absorbiert ist und der Reis und das Gemüse leicht gebräunt sind. Vom Herd nehmen. Bis zum Servieren abgedeckt durchziehen lassen.
  8. Mit Limettenspalten servieren.
Nasi Goreng – Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

 The Lotus and the Artichoke - MALAYSIA Kochbuch Cover

Apam Balik

Apam Balik from The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook

It was my first day in Kuala Lumpur…

I’d just arrived and was at the start of a 5 week culinary adventure to get a taste of Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo. The sun shone bright and the sky was that deep, satisfying shade of blue. I was on a short morning walk from the Winsin Hotel on the edge of downtown Chinatown, heading towards the Indian neighborhood.

Just outside the subway station on a particularly more urban street corner was a line of shiny, silver food trucks. My eye was caught immediately by one in particular: A woman was spilling roasted, candied peanuts and then corn kernels from a can onto a golden, round, thin pancake. She folded it over – making sort of a sweet taco – and placed it on a rack on the chrome counter of her street food cart. She caught me watching and smiled.

“Hey Mister! You try Apam Balik!”

Well, what could I say? I got closer and watched her make another two crepes. First, she stirred a simple batter of mostly rice flour and coconut milk and poured and spread the crepe on the sizzling griddle. Moments later, she pried up an edge, slid her spatula tracing under the circle, and flipped it over. I watched her again top the thin, crunchy crepes with peanuts and corn before folding them in half and setting them on the rack just in front of me.

Just then, a colorfully dressed Indian woman parted from a few family members and approached the cart from my side. She reached out an anxious hand in a dance-like gesture, rattling rows of wrist bangles, and scooped two of the Apim Balik pancakes from the rack. She rattled off a few sentences in Malay to the seller, they exchanged some money, and both giggled briefly. The Indian woman turned to me and extended one of the crepes until it was right in my face. She said to me in melodic Indian English:

“This one for you. Apam Balik. Peanut Pancake!”

It was in my grasp and between my teeth before I knew it. The crepe was crunchy on the outside but then soft and chewy, quickly giving way to the delightful combination of sweet and salty flavors from the roasted peanuts, punctuated by bursts of fresh corn juiciness. It was perfect. I devoured the rest of it.

Weeks later, back in Berlin, I set about to re-create the deliciousness.

For the vegan recipe in my MALAYSIA cookbook, I made a simple, sure-fire formula for making Apim Balik at home in the kitchen. I didn’t have to veganize anything. It’s a pretty much straight-up thin pancake batter based on rice flour, coconut milk and sugar, lending a crunchy thin crepe. For the filling, I simplified it going with just candied peanuts. My variations (below) include optionally topping it with a sweet syrup and going authentic street food style with sweet corn kernels.

Apam Balik

crispy, crunchy peanut-filled pancakes

recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

makes 4 to 6 / time 30 min +

  • 3/4 cup (100 g) peanuts crumbled or very coarsely ground
  • 2 Tbs sugar
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 cup (60 g) flour (all purpose / type 550)
  • 1/2 cup (50 g) rice flour
  • 1/4 cup (45 g) sugar
  • 1 Tbs corn starch
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 cup (240 ml) coconut milk
  • 2 Tbs water
  • agave syrup or coconut (palm) syrup optional
  • vegetable oil for frying pan
  1. Crumble or coarsely grind peanuts and dry roast in a pan on medium heat until golden brown and dark spots appear, 4–5 min. Add sugar and salt. Mix well. Stirring constantly, roast until sugar melts and mix starts to stick together, 1–2 min. Remove from heat.
  2. Combine flour, rice flour, sugar, corn starch, baking powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whisk in coconut milk and water gradually. Mix until mostly smooth, but do not over mix. Cover and let batter sit 20–30 min.
  3. Heat frying pan on medium high heat. Put a few drops of oil on pan and rub it around with a paper towel. Do this before each pancake. When a drop of water sizzles and dances on surface, pan is ready.
  4. Pour about 1/4 to 1/3 cup (60–80 ml) batter in the center of the hot pan. Tilt and turn the pan to form a large, thin, circular pancake.
  5. After bubbles appear on surface and underside is golden brown (about 2–3 min), use a spatula to carefully peel up the edges around the pancake and then flip it over. Cook the other side for 1–2 min, then flip it back over. Put 2–3 Tbs of the sugary peanuts on the pancake and roll up or fold over. Transfer to a plate. Repeat with other pancakes.
  6. Serve plain, or drizzle pancakes with agave syrup or coconut syrup.

Variations:

Creamy: Use peanut butter instead of roasted, crumbled peanuts. Bananas: Add sliced banana to filling. Traditional: Add 1–2 Tbs sweet corn kernels to each pancake filling.

Apam Balik - Malaysian Peanut Pancakes on Instagram (The Lotus and the Artichoke)

vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German

Malaysia vegan cookbook cover blockprint

 

Apam Balik from The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook

Apam Balik

knusprige Pancakes mit süßer Erdnussfüllung

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

4 bis 6 Portionen / Dauer 30 Min. +

  • 3/4 Tasse (100 g) Erdnüsse klein gehackt oder grob gemahlen
  • 2 EL Zucker
  • 1/4 TL Meersalz
  • 1/2 Tasse (65 g) Mehl (Type 550)
  • 1/2 Tasse (50 g) Reismehl
  • 1/4 Tasse (50 g) Zucker
  • 1 EL Speisestärke
  • 1 TL Backpulver
  • 1/2 TL Meersalz
  • 1 Tasse (240 ml) Kokosmilch
  • 2 EL Wasser
  • Pflanzenöl zum Ausbacken
  • Agaven– oder Kokosblütensirup wenn gewünscht
  1. Erdnüsse klein hacken oder grobmahlen und 4 bis 5 Min. in einer Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme rösten, bis sie goldbraun werden und dunkle Flecken bekommen. Zucker und Salz einrühren. 1 bis 2 Min. unter ständigem Rühren rösten, bis der Zucker schmilzt und die Mischung klebrig wird. Vom Herd nehmen.
  2. Mehl, Reismehl, Zucker, Speisestärke, Backpulver und Salz in einer großen Schüssel vermischen. Nach und nach Kokosmilch und Wasser einrühren. Verrühren, bis ein glatter Teig entsteht, aber nicht zu lange rühren. Abdecken und Teig 20 bis 30 Min. ruhen lassen.
  3. Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Einige Tropfen Öl in die Pfanne geben und mit einem Stück Küchenpapier verreiben. Vor jedem Pancake wiederholen. Die Pfanne ist heiß genug, wenn ein Tropfen Wasser zischend auf der Oberfläche herumspringt.
  4. 1/4 bis 1/3 Tasse (60 bis 80 ml) Teig in die Mitte der heißen Pfanne gießen. Pfanne schwenken, bis ein dünner kreisförmiger Pfannkuchen entsteht.
  5. 2 bis 3 Min. backen, bis auf der Oberfläche Bläschen entstehen und die Unterseite goldbraun ist. Pancake an den Rändern mit einem Pfannenwender anheben und vorsichtig wenden. Unterseite 1 bis 2 Min. backen und Pancake erneut wenden. 2 bis 3 EL der süßen Erdnussfüllung auf den Pancake geben und umschlagen oder aufrollen. Auf einen Teller geben. Restliche Pancakes zubereiten.
  6. Pur servieren oder mit Agaven– oder Kokosblütensirup beträufeln.

Variationen:

Cremig: Statt zerkleinerter Erdnüsse Erdnussbutter verwenden. Bananen: Bananenscheibchen zur Füllung geben. Traditionell: 1 bis 2 EL Zuckermaiskörner unter die Füllung rühren.

Apam Balik - Malaysian Peanut Pancakes on Instagram (The Lotus and the Artichoke)

Rezept aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

The Lotus and the Artichoke - MALAYSIA Kochbuch Cover

Nasi Lemak

Nasi Lemak from The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook

In the five weeks that I spent exploring Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo there were a few dishes that I just had to try whenever I had the chance.

Nasi Lemak is a national favorite – and one of my favorites, too! The name technically means “fatty rice” but “creamy rice” sounds a least a little bit better. Traditionally, as with this recipe, Nasi Lemak is rice cooked in creamy, coconut milk – often along with fresh herbs and spices such as pandan (which you can replace with bay leaves if that’s what you’ve got.) The bright yellow hue comes from turmeric. Though it’s a breakfast dish, it can be eaten at any time of the day, and many variations cross firmly into Savory Culinary Territory. I eat this all times of the day: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, whatever!

I tried Nasi Lemak in lots of places: Kuala Lampur, Penang, Malacca, and Singapore.

Inspired by those dishes and their accompaniments – and my own imagination, I’ve created a complete meal set: Coconut Pandan Rice served with stir-fried Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, crunchy, charred Spicy Nuts, and a delicious sweet-chili sauce known as Sambal Belacan.

These are actually four different recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA which I’ve put together in this one post. You can of course substitute or simplify the dishes for a less involved meal set designed how you like it. Nasi Lemak is equally awesome even when it’s just served with the fresh cucumber, lime slices, and nuts. I love going all out and doing the Lemongrass Tofu cubes, too. Also, I find the hot, spicy Samabal Belecan completes the dish fantastically.

How to eat it? Mix it up and eat it with your hands!

Serve this meal set up on a banana leaf, wash your hands, mix everything together, and dive in… wild and forkless. (By the way, frozen banana leaves are often available at your local Asian import grocery shop. Just thaw them, rinse them, and eat off of them.) If you prefer a more modern approach: Make it all, arrange it perfectly on plates, eat it with a fork and spoon. It’s up to you!

Nasi Lemak

Malaysian Coconut Pandan Rice with Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, Spicy Nuts & Sambal Belacan

recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

serves 3 to 4 / time 60 min

Coconut Pandan Rice:

  • 2 cups (375 g) broken jasmine rice or basmati rice
  • 1 2/3 cup (400 ml) water
  • 1 2/3 cup (400 ml) coconut milk
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric ground
  • 2 pandan leaves or bay leaves
  • fried onions for garnish
  • 1/2 small cucumber sliced
  • lime slices for garnish
  1. Rinse and drain rice thoroughly.
  2. Bring water and coconut milk to low boil in a medium pot with good lid. Stir in rice, salt, turmeric, and pandan (or bay leaves). Return to simmer. Cover and steam until most liquid is absorbed, 12–15 min. Remove from heat. Stir a few times. Cover and let sit 10 min. Remove and discard leaves before serving.
  3. Garnish with fried onions, cucumber, and lime slices.

Lemongrass Ginger Tofu:

  • 14 oz (400 g) firm tofu cut in cubes or strips
  • 1 1/2 cups (200 g) pineapple chopped
  • 1 Tbs oil
  • 2 shallots finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 2 stalks lemongrass finely chopped
  • 3/4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped
  • 1 tsp coriander ground
  • 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu)
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • fresh coriander or parsley leaves chopped, for garnish
  1. Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with a heavy cutting board and press out extra moisture, 15–20 min. Unwrap and cut in cubes or strips.
  2. Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok on medium high heat. Add chopped shallots, garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and ground coriander. Fry, stirring constantly, until shallots being to soften and brown, 2–3 min.
  3. Add tofu cubes. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu cubes are golden brown and crispy on the edges, 5–8 min.
  4. Add chopped pineapple, lime (or lemon) juice, soy sauce, and salt. Fry, stirring regularly, another 5–10 min. Remove from heat.

Spicy Nuts:

  • 1/2 cup (50 g) peanuts
  • 1/2 cup (50 g) cashews
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground
  • 2 tsp coconut sugar
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  1. Heat a medium frying pan on medium heat. Dry roast peanuts and cashews, stirring regularly, until light golden brown and dark spots begin to appear, 4–7 min. Do not burn.
  2. Add chili powder (or paprika), sugar and salt. Mix well. Continue to cook another 2–3 min, stirring constantly, until sugar has melted and nuts are well coated. Remove from heat. Allow to cool.

Sambal Belacan:

  • 2–3 Tbs vegetable oil
  • 5 large (90 g) red chilies chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic chopped
  • 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu)
  • 1 Tbs rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice
  • 1 Tbs coconut sugar
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  1. Blend all ingredients in a small food processor or blender until smooth, adding more oil (or some water) as needed.
  2. Heat a small frying pan on medium heat. Add blended spice paste to pan and fry, stirring regularly, until sauce darkens, thickens, and oil separates, 8–12 min.
(available as printed cookbook & ebook in English & German)
Malaysia vegan cookbook cover blockprint

Nasi Lemak from The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook

Nasi Lemak

Kokos-Pandanus-Reis mit Zitronengras-Ingwer-Tofu, pikanten Nüssen & Sambal Belacan

Rezepte aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

3 bis 4 Portionen / Dauer 60 Min.

Kokos-Pandanus-Reis:

  • 2 Tassen (375 g) Bruchreis (Jasmin oder Basmati)
  • 1 2/3 Tasse (400 ml) Wasser
  • 1 2/3 Tasse (400 ml) Kokosmilch
  • 1/2 TL Meersalz
  • 1/2 TL Kurkuma gemahlen
  • 2 Pandanus- oder Lorbeerblätter
  • Röstzwiebeln zum Garnieren
  • 1/2 kleine Gurke in Scheiben geschnitten
  • Limettenspalten zum Garnieren
  1. Reis gut spülen und abgießen.
  2. In einem mittelgroßen Topf mit gut schließendem Deckel Wasser und Kokosmilch zum Köcheln bringen. Reis, Salz, Kurkuma und Pandanus– oder Lorbeerblätter einrühren. Erneut zum Köcheln bringen. Abdecken und 12 bis 15 Min. garen, bis der größte Teil der Flüssigkeit absorbiert ist.
  3. Vom Herd nehmen. Einige Male umrühren, abdecken und 10 Min. ziehen lassen. Vor dem Servieren die Blätter entfernen.
  4. Mit Röstzwiebeln, Gurkenscheiben und Limettenspalten garnieren.

Zitronengras-Ingwer-Tofu:

  • 400 g fester Tofu in Würfel oder Scheiben geschnitten
  • 1 1/2 Tassen (200 g) Ananas gehackt
  • 1 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 2 Schalotten fein gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen fein gehackt
  • 2 Stängel Zitronengras fein gehackt
  • 2 cm frischer Ingwer fein gehackt
  • 1 TL Koriander gemahlen
  • 1 EL Limetten- oder Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Sojasoße (Shoyu)
  • 1/4 TL Meersalz
  • frisches Koriandergrün oder Petersilie gehackt, zum Garnieren
  1. Tofu in Platten schneiden und in ein sauberes Geschirrtuch wickeln. 15 bis 20 Min. mit einem schweren Schneidebrett beschweren, um überschüssige Flüssigkeit herauszupressen. Auswickeln und in Würfel oder Scheiben schneiden.
  2. In einem großen Topf oder einer großen Pfanne Öl auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Schalotten, Knoblauch, Zitronengras und gemahlenen Koriander hineingeben. 2 bis 3 Min. unter ständigem Rühren anbraten, bis die Schalotten weich werden und zu bräunen beginnen.
  3. Tofuwürfel zugeben und gut umrühren. Unter regelmäßigem Rühren 5 bis 8 Min. braten, bis die Tofuwürfel goldbraun und an den Rändern knusprig sind.
  4. Gehackte Ananas, Limetten– oder Zitronensaft, Sojasoße und Salz einrühren. Weitere 5 bis 10 Min. unter ständigem Rühren braten. Vom Herd nehmen.
  5. Mit gehacktem Koriandergrün oder Petersilie garnieren.

Pikante Nüsse:

  • 1/2 Tasse (50 g) Erdnüsse
  • 1/2 Tasse (50 g) Cashewkerne
  • 1/2 TL Chili- oder Paprikapulver
  • 2 TL Kokosblütenzucker
  • 1/4 TL Meersalz
  1. Eine mittelgroße Pfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Erdnüsse und Cashewkerne 4 bis 7 Min. darin rösten, bis sie leicht goldbraun sind und sich braune Flecken bilden. Nicht anbrennen lassen.
  2. Chili– oder Paprikapulver, Zucker und Salz zugeben und gut umrühren. 2 bis 3 weitere Minuten unter ständigem Rühren rösten, bis der Zucker schmilzt und die Nüsse gut mit der Gewürzmischung überzogen sind. Vom Herd nehmen und abkühlen lassen.

Sambal Belacan:

  • 2–3 EL Pflanzenöl
  • 5 große (90 g) rote Chilischoten gehackt
  • 2 Knoblauchzehen gehackt
  • 1 EL Sojasoße (Shoyu)
  • 1 EL Reisessig
  • 1 EL Limetten- oder Zitronensaft
  • 1 EL Kokosblütenzucker
  • 1/4 TL Meersalz
  1. Alle Zutaten in einer kleinen Küchenmaschine oder einem kleinen Mixer glatt pürieren. Öl nach und nach je nach Bedarf zugeben (oder mehr Wasser).
  2. Eine kleine Bratpfanne auf mittlerer Flamme erhitzen. Gewürzpastein die Pfanne geben und 8 bis 12 Min. unter ständigem Rühren reduzieren, bis die Soße dunkel wird, eindickt und das Öl sich trennt.

Vegane Rezepte aus The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA

The Lotus and the Artichoke - MALAYSIA Kochbuch Cover